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Sustainable Lifestyle: green is the new black

Sustainable Lifestyle: green is the new black

Sustainable Lifestyle: green is the new black

International markets value and perceive the importance of lifestyle brands being sustainable, ethical, and transparent differently. Scandinavia in particular is well-known and praised for standing at the forefront of sustainable development. Ranging from fashion weeks in Copenhagen and Stockholm aiming to be fully sustainable, to fashion brands having high sustainable standards, it is now challenging to find a Scandinavian fashion brand that does not use sustainable materials or openly shares its production processes. 

Two models which work exceptionally well for fashion and lifestyle brands are circular and slow. We have gathered exclusive insights from 3 Scandinavian-based sustainable fashion brands to find out more about these models and how to implement them.

Circular fashion

There are multiple ways in which brands can now engage in a circular fashion, the most common way that sustainable brands use is to facilitate the recycling opportunities of a product. It’s essential that brands guide consumers on how to recycle their products by the end of use. It is also worth noting, that circular fashion is not only about the use of sustainable and re-purposed materials, but also includes pre-owned selling and buying which has been rising in popularity.

Vintage fashion is no longer described as outdated, but has become sought after and recently expanded 21 times faster than conventional apparel model commerce since 2019. Pre-owned fashion brings fashion one step closer to being circular and is the most obvious way of extending the lifetime of a product.

The concept of circular fashion is fast-growing and is gaining much attention among sustainable fashion brands, as the fashion industry is facing pressure from a new generation of consumers who demand more sustainable options within fashion. In fact, the potential value of fashion’s circular economy is said to be at $5 trillion. Making circular fashion processes an attractive and promising alternative to fashion’s linear production model.

VOCAST spoke to two entrepreneurs who both founded circular fashion brands so you can learn more about what it means in the Scandinavian market:

Industry insight: The Vintage Bar & reWear it

Marie Louise Schultz | Founder at The Vintage Bar

At the end of 2017, Marie Louise Schultz started The Vintage Bar with a clear mission, she wanted to inspire people and make them inspire others by showing that secondhand can be as cool as new: “I hope to inspire people to sustainably participate in fashion by selling and buying secondhand. I knew I wanted to start something myself, and I was aware of the impact of the fashion industry on our planet, so it was also important for me to support conscious behavior.”

Yasmin Matos | CEO & Founder at reWear it

Yasmin Matos is the CEO & Founder of reWear it, Denmark’s fashion rental mobile app. Yasmin is Brazilian and moved to Denmark to launch her startup. The app was launched in the market last July: “Our platform was built for women who love fashion but also want to reduce consumption, giving them access to brands they desire at a lower cost. They can make an extra income lending their unworn items, and get to wear new clothing with more frequency, fulfilling the desire for fashion.”

 

In your opinion, what are some common perceptions consumers have about circular fashion and brands that market themselves to be sustainable?

Marie Louise: As we come out of the COVID-19 crisis, consumers are looking for even more purpose from brands than before. They are expecting brands to be authentic to who they are and to offer products with value. Furthermore, consumers are having higher expectations of brands when it comes to their sustainability goals, and also when it comes to the fashion life cycle, such as overproduction and overconsumption.

Yasmin: I believe that many consumers understand how important it is that fashion brands take sustainable initiatives but also that only “initiatives” are not enough. Fashion circularity is not a concept fully understood by many, but most of them are aware of the necessary actions. The problem is so big and the whole industry needs to change, but consumers are also changing by themselves as the industry is not really doing enough; choosing to buy less, going for second-hand shopping, upcycling, renting, and so on. I believe consumers will definitely appreciate seeing brands changing and taking major steps towards circular fashion and sustainability, but being very honest and transparent about the impact they still may cause.

What kind of role do you think that the Scandinavian lifestyle industry is playing in the global conversation about sustainability?

Marie Louise: Being the home of some of the most sustainable brands, Scandinavia is playing a major role in the global conversation about sustainability by showing forward-looking and innovative business models. Globally, the lifestyle industry is of course doing things to reduce the enrivonmnetal impact of fashion, but Scandinavia is without any doubt speeding up the industry’s transition in a more sustainble direction. With events like the Global Fashion Agenda (Copenhagen Fashion Summit), the Scandinavian lifestyle industry is guiding the global industry to take action by introducing more conscious and innovative approaches. These event gather an important list of stakeholder to spread the word.

Yasmin: I chose to found a sustainable fashion-tech startup in Denmark specifically because of the role Scandinavia is playing when the talk is on green solutions. Scandinavian lifestyle is all about being part of a community, making life simple, practical and meaningful, and these are essential values when considering changing our habits drastically to help the environment. The whole world is watching what we are doing here, to see how it goes, how it works, and I do think that Scandinavian companies are working to lead the actions.

Have you noticed any trends in circular and sustainable fashion brands when it comes to marketing?

Marie Louise: More than anything else the tone of voice has changed to a sustainability narrative that is attractive to the specific target audience.

Yasmin: The most recent campaign by Levi’s in the Nordics has the same saying as reWear it’s pitch deck (“Global clothing consumption has doubled in the last 15 years. We can change that.”), so I believe that mentioning a green solution in the same package of a new pair of jeans or a nice dress, is definitely a marketing trend nowadays. Many brands are using and will use that but as said before, the consumer is getting every day more aware of the problem. I believe that it’s also a trend that we will have tools to measure which brands are really making real efforts before buying them and which solutions really work.

Slow fashion: a discussion with Buena Onda 

The second model that fashion and lifestyle brands can implement to be truly sustainable is the slow fashion model. A slow fashion model follows the opposite principles of fast fashion meaning that collections are fewer, pieces are more specific and waste is rarer. Slow fashion brands tend to follow the idea that creativity and authenticity to the artistry, production, durability, and wearability are worthy of as much time as it takes to get the product right for the consumer.

Designers are given as much space as they need to create their art, tailors are given proper time to construct the products in a safe and ethical environment. This model easily leans into ecological sustainability because products are designed in such a way that will naturally produce less waste – in essence, they are created for honest direct demand rather than inauthentically driving sales.

 

Farah Raghed | Buena Onda Founder & Creative Director

Buena Onda is a summer lifestyle brand that releases only three items every summer. Founder & Creative director Farah Raghed sat down with VOCAST to discuss some of her insights as a brand builder and consultant on what slow fashion really means and how the industry can learn from a slow business model:

What are some common perceptions brands have about what slow fashion means, and what advice can you give to those wanting to implement a slow fashion model?

Farah: Before I got into this space, some brands released six to eight or even up to 36 collections a year if not more – and when I used to read about slow fashion in the media, it usually highlighted the quality, craftsmanship and storytelling. So when the idea for Buena Onda came, it was to step away from everything I’ve known to do things my way –  I went slow because I saw the industry in front of me going really fast and that model not really working.

 

Creative directors can’t be creative at the snap of a finger, human creativity just doesn’t work like that. So we also started to see that sustainability elements and positive impact elements were becoming a part of the more simplistic model by default.

 

“The principle about starting a slow brand is putting you back in the equation.”

Would you also say that it’s not just about ecological sustainability but also humanitarian sustainability – people’s working and living balance for example?

Farah: Yes, it’s a holistic approach, we follow a full circle model meaning we radiate positive impact at every level of operation. So when you’re good, your business is good, nature is good and when you’re good to people nature and yourself your soul is good.

This holistic approach to brand building gives people the space to be human and give them time in what they are pursuing. It’s a mindset shift to go into this slow pace. What you see in the industry and on social media can make you feel like you’re out of the loop but you take the decision to be out of that loop.

So would you advise consciously removing yourself from the societal exceptions?

Farah: Yes, and I work with a lot of founders and co-founders consulting them on their brand building and the beautiful thing when they do slow down is that their engagement numbers go up, why? Because their quality is going up. So I would really advise those wanting to be a slow brand is find where their bliss is, how can they work in a way that suits their lifestyle, their mindset. So design a brand in a way that suits you and makes you feel blissful more often than not.

What kind of role do you think that the Scandinavian lifestyle industry is playing in the global conversation about sustainability?

Farah: Well, Scandinavia has some good PR across the globe about an area that is very conscious sustainably – it has a good reputation. In the space of fashion, having come to Copenhagen to consult for some major fashion brands here, I think that a lot of brands are still following a fast fashion model. So I believe that there is still a long way to go in terms of changing the mindset of the businesses in the fashion space, but I think that the majority of them are taking big strides towards that which is pretty incredible. I believe that they have the right intention around it but for any company running for X amount of years, it takes time to shift and change.

 

It really is about a mindset shift and it would be absolutely amazing to see more Scandinavian brands take that route and think smaller. I will say though that Scandinavia is having a great global conversation especially with the launch of Vogue Scandinavia with a perspective no Vogue has had before. But in general,

 

“we’re coming to a point now when consumers aren’t having it any other way and brands will be driven by consumer demand and it’s a beautiful thing.”

Have you noticed any trends in slow and sustainable fashion brands when it comes to marketing?

Farah: Sustainability isn’t just about the materials we use and the packaging we use, yes it’s intertwined into that but for us, we follow a path of true sustainability so that means the essence of how we do things is sustainable. Our marketing is very human-centred – we don’t say B2B or B2C it’s human to human for us. We don’t bombard our community pushing them to buy products from us, we tell stories, share chill summer destinations and share blissful imagery. We post our campaign and when our consumers wear them we repost them and people see them around.

 

“From a communications standpoint, our sustainability message is what we are – our brand speaks for its self: its three items every summer and every collection connects to the next over the years.”

Greenwashing: the do’s and don’ts of sustainability marketing

With the relevance of sustainability in lifestyle marketing, it is essential to use it as a valuable aspect and not turn into what could potentially be considered as “green washing”. Greenwashing can be defined as when a company uses false claims to suggest its eco-responsibility, making it challenging for consumers to have a clear overview of how sustainable a brand is. It is for that reason that a brand’s sustainability claims should be humble and specific, sustainability is a journey and there is always work to do before reaching a point that fully satisfies consumers.

There are various ways in which brands can reach a stage of transparency through honest marketing strategies, while also avoiding any reference that could possibly be considered as greenwashing:

Use numbers instead of words

Avoid using words such as “eco-friendly” and “sustainable” without presenting any numbers. Consumers find numbers more meaningful. Present the sustainable goals of your brand through science and data. If your products are made of recycled material, be clear about what percentage of your products are made of recycled materials.

Be transparent!

Provide detailed information and tracking about supply chains. Trace the source of where the materials come from, customers like to know from where their clothes come. This also includes transparency about your company’s carbon emissions water consumption and waste production. Share honest information about the work conditions in which the manufacturers work, consumers value good work ethics.

Offer visual engagement

Consumers enjoy being informed on what a company does and how it contributes to sustainability. A relevant way to offer informative sources is through pictures and videos, demonstrating what causes a company to stand behind, while also informing and encouraging the audience to get involved.

Sustainability goes beyond green

As a company, go beyond caring for the environment. Diversity and inclusion are huge assets when ensuring sustainability. Acknowledge and be transparent about diversity and gender equality within the company. Diversity, gender equality, and work ethics are of growing relevance, and consumers appreciate knowing that they are purchasing products from a brand that supports equity, diversity, and inclusion.

Facts & figures:

  1. 57% of consumers are willing to change their purchasing habits to help reduce negative environmental impact.
  2. 71% of consumers indicate that transparency is important and they are willing to pay more for brands that provide that.
  3. 46% of consumers are value-driven in the clothing and footwear industry, while 35% are purpose-driven.
  4. 45% of consumers look for brands that are sustainable and/or environmentally responsible.
  5. 72% of consumers are willing to pay more for brands that are sustainable and/or environmentally responsible.

Sustainability across 10 markets

DENMARK 🇩🇰

What kind of magazines, influencers, media can we find on the Danish list?

This curated list includes sustainability influencers, online platforms, and sustainability advocates. Many of the influencers included in the list are incorporating sustainability in their everyday life, their platforms aren’t solely focusing on sustainability – but they are focused on living a sustainable lifestyle and inspiring others to do the same. The common belief among the contacts of this list is; that even the small things matter in creating a sustainable future. 

How do these contacts reflect the current view on sustainability in Denmark?

Sustainability has become an integrated part of Danish society and is somehow almost expected amongst brands and large corporations to be incorporated. This change in society is a reflection of a rising interest in sustainability among Danes. Many contacts in the list are into re-using, and how to be more sustainable simply by being more aware of your consumption and re-using what you already have; Signe Hansen and Ann P. are both advocates of re-using. 

Sarah Friis – Danish Lifestyle Researcher 

SWEDEN 🇸🇪

What kind of magazines, influencers, media can we find on the Swedish list?

This curated list is a mix of influencers, editors, online platforms, and other creatives advocating for a sustainable lifestyle. Some are opinion leaders traveling around Sweden giving lectures like Johanna Leymann, while others simply want to inspire people with their choice of consumption and through the brands they’re interacting with like, Signe Siemsen. 

How do these contacts reflect the current view on sustainability in Denmark?

Most influencers and editors on the Swedish market are interested in sustainability and make sustainable choices from time to time. But they don’t live a sustainable lifestyle. The contacts on this curated list want to inspire others and make a difference, either through their social media profile or in their profession. They don’t brand themselves as sustainable, even though they have the aesthetic, but educates their audience through their content. The slow-living lifestyle that is so prominent on the Swedish market is dominant on this list.

Josefine Forslund – Swedish Market Coordinator 

NORWAY 🇳🇴

What kind of magazines, influencers, media can we find on the Norwegian list?

The sustainable lifestyle Norway list comprises a variety of different contacts. The selected contacts present various approaches to sustainability, including influencers that promote more mindful consumption and sustainable brands, magazine editors that put sustainability on the agenda, to entrepreneurs of more eco-friendly lifestyle businesses. This illustrates how sustainability is present across numerous lifestyle practices and businesses.

How do these contacts reflect the current view on sustainability in Norway?

Norway has implemented sustainable approaches and business processes from early on and has thus earned a reputation as an environmental nation. In recent years, there has been an increased focus on environmental concerns, especially among the younger population. This is also seen among influencers and editors. While there are few influencers that fully devote their brand and content to sustainability, they do to a larger extent than before strive to make sustainable choices. These contacts can effectively spread the message of more environmental consumption.

Sara Linvåg Næss – Norwegian Market Coordinator 

GERMANY 🇩🇪

What kind of magazines, influencers, media can we find on the German list?

This curated list summarizes the most relevant German contacts when it comes to the topic of sustainability. Here you can find influencers, magazines, podcasters, editors, blogazines, and freelance journalists, of which all have one thing in common. This is, having a conscious lifestyle at heart and writing essentially about what inspired them.

From relevant online magazines such as „Viertel Vor“ & „Fashion Changers“ to elevating personalities such as Kim Gerlach and Annemarie Bernhard, this list has united all advocates for responsible living. 

How do these contacts reflect the current view on sustainability in Germany?

The topics of sustainability and conscious living have received a lot of attention in recent years. Climate change and our natural habitat dissolving have convinced many Germans to change their views and look out for sources that promote a lifestyle that encourages dealing with resources more responsibly. Political uprising underpins this movement, with green parties and entities all over the country gaining popularity. Editors, Magazines, and Influencers are interested in sustainability and the incorporation thereof in their content in one way or another. A mindful way of life that focuses on the „right“ choices characterizes this list. 

Kevin Pretzel – German Market Coordinator 

FRANCE 🇫🇷

What kind of magazines, influencers, media can we find on the French list?

The sustainable lifestyle list for the French market consists of some of the most prominent sustainable influencers. Covering topics such as sustainable fashion, tips to living a zero-waste lifestyle as well as inclusivity and body positivity. The list also consists of various media such as podcasts about sustainable fashion and online publications that focus on sustainable lifestyles and brands.

How do these contacts reflect the current view on sustainability in France?

Most of the contacts within the french sustainable lifestyle list are passionate about sustainability and want to encourage their followers to have a sustainable lifestyle as well. The other contacts are interested in specific aspects of sustainability, such as nutrition and interior, and are rather seeking to inspire their audience. Lastly, many influencers, editors and magazines, in the French market, do not only consider “being sustainable” as only caring for the environment,  but also value inclusivity and diversity, and consider it as being as essential as sustainability.

Ema Laurenzana – French Lifestyle Researcher

ITALY 🇮🇹

What kind of magazines, influencers, media can we find on the Italian list?

The lists include the main contacts when talking about sustainability and the environment in Italy. From sustainable fashion to healthy food and lifestyle tips in general. Along with influencers and sustainable editors for the main magazines, the list includes magazines such as DailyGreen (which covers all topics concerning the environment, green economy, and lifestyle), Solo Moda Sostenibile (about sustainable fashion), and so on. 

How do these contacts reflect the current view on sustainability in Italy?

Italy is getting there when it comes to being sustainable, many influencers promote a healthy lifestyle and more people are becoming involved in second-hand buying or recycling of products and materials. I think the list matches the overall interest that Italy has towards become more sustainable. However, the country is still in the early stages of the process.

Federica Manzi – Italian Lifestyle Researcher

THE NETHERLANDS 🇳🇱

What kind of magazines, influencers, media can we find on the Dutch list?

The Dutch sustainable lifestyle list consists of influencers covering subjects such as sustainable fashion, plant-based food, and also sustainable home interior. The list also includes various media focusing on sustainability, such as online publications and podcasts. Lastly, there are also contacts within the list who do not specifically define themselves as “eco-friendly” but rather cover subjects such as inclusivity and self-love.

How do these contacts reflect the current view on sustainability in The Netherlands?

Sustainability in the Netherlands is very important, and it is becoming inevitable to not find a media or an influencer that does not take a stance on sustainability. Most of the contacts within the list are really seeking to inspire people to make a change, whether it be in terms of consuming habits or nutrition. It is also important to note, that some of the contacts consider their lifestyles as being fully sustainable, making them particularly selective when it comes to working with brands.

BELGIUM 🇧🇪

What kind of magazines, influencers, media can we find on the Belgian list?

The curated list for the Belgian lifestyle market consists of influencers that stand for sustainable fashion, interior, nutrition, and also traveling. Furthermore, the list also includes magazines, editors as well as chefs, covering sustainability as their main focus.

How do these contacts reflect the current view on sustainability in Belgium?

Most of the contacts in the list are interested in sustainable fashion or interior but do not fully live a sustainable lifestyle, although they are still careful when selecting brands or products that they use or wear. While the magazines and chefs within the list, are seeking to inspire others to shop and cook sustainably.

THE UK 🇬🇧

What kind of magazines, influencers, media can we find on the UK list?

This curated list contains a mix of magazines and influencers all advocating for a sustainable lifestyle. The majority of the magazines are online publications and cover all areas of lifestyle such as fashion, home interior, beauty & wellness, food & gastronomy, family life, and even travel. The influencers in this list vary from boho-chic green living advocates to city-dwellers sharing their conscious life habits with their followers.

How do these contacts reflect the current view on sustainability in the UK?

Sustainability is not as ingrained into the British lifestyle as it is in Scandinavia, however, the eco-boom amongst influencers especially is on the rise and these are the leading creative contacts to get to know. Magazines targeted towards sustainability have usually been separated from other lifestyle magazines in the UK, but recently sustainability editors and segments in traditional lifestyle publications are becoming more common.

Georgina Juel – The UK Market Coordinator

THE US 🇺🇸

What kind of magazines, influencers, media can we find on the US list?

This list is made up of a mix of online platforms, magazines, influencers, and creatives dedicated to sustainability in most aspects of life. Many of the contacts are individual creators such as Simply Living Well who’s showcasing dedication to the suitability movement through home/living content while others like Mikaela Loach take on the role of activist and voice opinions regarding the movement bluntly often while showing off a great sustainable outfit at the same time.

How do these contacts reflect the current view on sustainability in the US?

Those interested in sustainability in the US like to make that clear, as they often, like these contacts subscribe to an idea of the movement that reaches beyond the individual commodity. Although the dedication to the movement in the US is quite the individual standpoint supporters of the movement represent a view of sustainability that is often versatile and involves slow-living/low-impact, social justice, and environmentalist aspects. They are advocates for living well through these practices and gladly brand themselves as such. They won’t hesitate to stress the need and urgency for a shift to a sustainable lifestyle approach to their audiences whether that’s by showcasing sustainable fashion options or advocating for policy change. 

Cerena Kulego – The US Lifestyle Researcher

Sustainability contacts

DENMARK

Signe Hansen – Signe is a well-known sustainable influencer focusing mainly on fashion, living in Denmark.

Reach: 84.1K

Instagram: @useless_dk

Website: https://www.uselesswardrobe.dk/blog/

SWEDEN

MAKE IT LAST – Make it last is a network of fashion creatives, with a focus on sustainability. Make it Last produces digital media content, consult brands and reach creative audiences.

Reach: 28K

Website: https://makeitlast.se

NORWAY

Celine Aagaard – is a veteran in the Norwegian media landscape, and has been the Editor-in-Chief of several leading magazines. Additionally, she has established herself as a fashion influencer, advocating more environmental, timeless clothing pieces, and as the founder of her own, sustainable clothing brand. She currently holds the position of Sustainability Expert at the newly launched Vogue Scandinavia.

Reach: 188K

Website: https://envelope1976.com/

GERMANY

Fashion Changers – is an online publication that creates content about sustainability in the fashion and beauty industry.

Reach: 27K

Website: https://fashionchangers.de

FRANCE

Rosa B – is a French influencer and YouTuber, based in Lille. Rosa makes content about vintage fashion and upcycling, she also often shares sustainable brands that she appreciates.

Reach: 82K

Website: https://rosabohneur.fr

ITALY

Doina – Is a Moldovian fashion influencer based in Milan, Italy. She cares deeply about the environment, sharing tips and sponsoring brands that are sustainable. She is the ambassador of “no more plastic” and she owns a jewelry line made of recycled materials. She has worked with many high-end and luxury brands, including Louis Vuitton. 

Reach: 802K

Website: http://doina.co/

THE NETHERLANDS

Bedrock Magazine – is the online magazine for a conscious and healthy lifestyle, the pillars are simple: mind, body, and a better world. 

Reach: 361K

Website: https://www.bedrock.nl

BELGIUM

Eline Reynders – is an online marketeer with a heart for sustainability and fair fashion based in Belgium.

Reach: 30K

Website: https://www.elinerey.be

THE UK

Flora Beverley  – Flora is a health and fitness blogger from the UK. Her blog focuses on beauty, food, travel, physical and mental health, and sustainability. With her blog and social media platforms, she aims to document her lifestyle in a way that inspires her follower to be more healthy in the body, the mind, and the planet.

Reach: 132K

Website: https://foodfitnessflora.blog/blog/

THE US

Jazmine Rogers (That Curly Top) – Through her colorful style and feed, Jazmine approaches sustainability from a specific angle: the intersection of sustainability and race. Shedding a light on the fashion industry, its exploitative working conditions in developing countries, and environmental inequities which are strongly intertwined.

Reach: 124K

Website: https://www.canva.com/design/ 

Georgina is the UK Market Coordinator at VOCAST, responsible for British fashion and lifestyle research. Along with her work at VOCAST and studies at Copenhagen Business School, she is passionate about conscious fashion reform in the industry.
Ema is the Lifestyle Researcher for the French market at VOCAST. She grew up in Brussels and previously worked with fashion PR. She is currently stuyding a master’s degree in international development and business and has a strong interest in sustainable and ethical pratices within the fashion industry.

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Get familiar with Pinterest

Pinterest is more than just a medium to share photos, videos, and other inspiring content. Its abilities go beyond being a regular social media network. Read along to get insight on why Pinterest stands out in terms of driving traffic and marketing value for individuals but brands especially.

With more than 400 million people visiting Pinterest every month, Pinterest holds a huge potential to increase and drive traffic but also to raise awareness in regards to interesting stories and streams of content. People are on Pinterest to try new things, save new ideas, and often to make their next purchase. Insights show that 85% of the users on Pinterest go to the platform when starting a new project.

Furthermore, the platform attracts mostly female users, as six out of ten pinners are women who are mainly interested in home decor and interior boards. Looking for and finding inspiration is Pinterest’s business model as it offers a huge variety of clickable boards, and its users have more than 200 billion pins saved which account for the credibility of the platform and makes it attractive for marketers and inspiration seekers. With over 28% of marketers using the platform for their business efforts, and 97% of searches on the platform being unbranded, there is a wide area of use for different purposes.

Pinterest is where people browse, discover and buy. Show up at the moment of inspiration, and take your audience from idea to “I did”.

– Pinterest Business

How to use Pinterest as a brand

Distributing your content as a brand on Pinterest is very easily managed. The platform makes it possible to organize content tailored to your needs, including organizing boards in regards to themes, ideas, plans, or types of inspiration. It will be very easy for Pinfluencers and users to click through your boards and share or re-pin their favorites. As a brand, you are also able to make your posts “shoppable”, which means consumers can directly access any product being advertised on any curated board. Furthermore, the platform offers a “live links” function on content which enables you as a brand to drive traffic to your own website or business directly through the curated post. This is especially valuable if you enable clickable links in your content.

Another aspect worth highlighting is that building a community with Pinterest has become easier than it has ever been before. The platform is built upon interaction and is a two-way street. This makes it possible to build long-term relationships with your followers by, for example: following their accounts, commenting on similar content to yours, using the right keywords/hashtags, and matching your presence on Pinterest with all your other social media channels. If you want to step up your game even more, the option to pay for a “Pinterest ads account” will enable you to run ads on the platform, increasing your visibility and engagement rates even more.

People on Pinterest are eager for new ideas, which means they want to hear from you. Content from brands doesn’t interrupt on Pinterest – it inspires.

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The benefits of working with Pinfluencers

Pinterest is a social media platform designed for commerce, making it the go-to place for consumers in the mood for shopping – or for those looking for inspiration. This makes Pinterest the ideal place for consumers to get to know your brand. Pinterest as a marketing tool isn’t solely targeted towards brands directly. Collaborations with Pinfluencers can be the easiest way to access large followings on Pinterest. Consumers are inspired by their favorite Pinfluencers and are seeking their platforms to find inspiration for their next purchase. For that reason, Pinfluencers can be a valuable asset for your brand – making your products visible on the ultimate go-to platform for inspiration.

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Fashion Predictions

Athflow - Athflow is the new Athleisure

“When athleisure meets elegance—that’s athflow. Flowy pants, casual jumpsuits, and oversized outfits will replace athletic clothes as the new go-to loungewear. Athflow is professional enough for the “office,” stretchy enough for the yoga mat, and comfy enough for the couch”

Cocoon Swoon - Cocooning is the new Layering

“Blankets as a fashion statement? Oh yes. Pinners will turn to shawls, puffers, and slouchy socks in 2021—no matter the weather. Let’s make cozy comfort part of every season”

Up clothes and personal - make it is the new work it

“Make it your own. Gen Z will take personalization to the next level with DIY everything, from painted-on denim to custom crewneck sweatshirts”

Home Predictions

Vibey Lights - Neon hue is the new you

“Neon rooms will get the spotlight treatment—especially from Gen Z. Pinners will reinvent their bedrooms with bright, color-drenched lighting for majorly moody looks. LED lighting is a 2021 vibe”

Dish is out - Shelfies are the new gallery walls

“Calling it now: kitchen shelves will be the new favorite corner of the house in 2021. People will collect and invest in eye-catching dinnerware, from colored glassware to handmade clay plates”

Japandi aesthetic - Japandi is the new modern

“Every decor lover just swooned. Japanese design meets Scandinavian minimalism in this rising home decor trend. Sleek lines, neutral color schemes, and calming setups will be on the radars of Pinners everywhere”

More door - Cloffice is the new home office

“Say goodbye to open floor plans. Pinners are getting creative with closed doors. In 2021 we’ll all learn what a “cloffice” is. Even when doors aren’t available, people will find new ways to create some personal space”

Beauty Predictions

Skinimalism - Skinimalism is the new glow up

“It’s the end of the caked-on makeup look. Pinners will embrace slow beauty and let their natural skin texture shine through. This new “effortlessly chic” routine is simple and sustainable”

Indie beauty - Cheeky is the new chic

“Take it from Gen Z: indie isn’t what it used to be. Their version is defined by bold-colored crop tops, baggy jeans, and emoji-inspired makeup and nails. When it comes to beauty, 2021 will be about feelin’ cute”

Poppin' protective styles - Low-maintenance is the new high heat

“Pinners will get creative with braiding techniques that are protective, low-maintenance, and glamorous. Beyond the braids, style mavens will add their own personal touch with beads or colorful highlights”

Rainbrows - Defiant brows the new defined brows

“Brush up your brow game. In 2021, people will embrace bold brows and experiment with statement-making styles. Nothing is too out-of-the-brow this year”

To get access to the curated lists of Pinfluencers and more;

   
Image: Unsplash

References: Pinterest

Sarah is the Lifestyle Researcher for the Danish market at VOCAST. She is very passionate about the fashion industry and along with her work at VOCAST she studies Communication at Copenhagen Business School.

Kevin is the German Lifestyle Researcher at VOCAST. He has a degree in Fashion Journalism and Media, which makes him an expert in all things fashion and lifestyle. While he currently undergoes his second education in Marketing & Communication Design, he also established a strong interest in Social Media and Communication Strategy.

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This August, the highly anticipated Vogue Scandinavia was launched. Comprising a whole region, the edition covers the Nordic countries of Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. The magazine aims to be an emblem of modern Nordic fashion, combining elements from...

Vogue Scandinavia

Vogue Scandinavia

Vogue Scandinavia

This August, the highly anticipated Vogue Scandinavia was launched. Comprising a whole region, the edition covers the Nordic countries of Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. The magazine aims to be an emblem of modern Nordic fashion, combining elements from all the Nordic countries to highlight the characteristics of their unique fashion. 

Vogue is with its vast history and global impact considered a worldwide fashion authority. The power of Vogue and the impact of being featured in a Vogue magazine has acquainted the magazine a status of a guiding star for readers and brands to follow. Therefore, the launch of Vogue Scandinavia marks a significant moment in the Scandinavian fashion history.

The 28th edition of Vogue: Vogue Scandinavia

In June 2020 the launch of Vogue Scandinavia was officially announced. With the ever increasing impact of Scandinavia as a fashion destination, the new edition was met with excitement – it serves as a natural addition to the catalogue of different Vogues. The magazine emphasises the role of Scandinavian fashion on an international level.

By publishing Vogue Scandinavia in English, the magazine isn’t only made easy accessible for the Nordic countries, but worldwide. In addition to representing key features of Scandinavian fashion, the magazine takes a political stand on concerns and values of the Nordic region.

Vogue: a fashion history 

Vogue Magazine originates from America, where the first ever edition saw the light in 1892. Since 1909, the magazines have been part of Condé Nast Publishers. Vogues first international edition, British Vogue, was launched in 1916, and marked the beginning of what would become a global fashion powerhouse. Today, Vogue is published in a total of 19 languages, targeting a massive worldwide audience. The launch of Vogue Scandinavia marks the magazines’ 26th international edition.

With its long history and establishment, Vogue Magazine has heavily influenced the development of the fashion magazine industry. Furthermore, its impact on fashion trends remains prevalent to this day. In 2009, The New York Times named Vogue “high fashion’s bible”.

Vogue Scandinavia ethos: Sustainability on the front page

Vogue Scandinavia aims to cover fashion in a sustainable matter. Its Editor-in-Chief, Martina Bonnier, has been working actively with sustainable fashion for the past 20 years – and has made sure that environmental matters are a key pillar in the launch of Vogue, being carbon neutral from day one. This represents the love and care of nature that is apparent across the Nordics. According to Bonnier, it is this common link of nature that binds Nordic people together. This is reflected in the first issue of Vogue Scandinavia, and will remain a central theme in upcoming issues.

 

“Our goal is to give back more than we consume, to become carbon negative throughout our whole value chain”

– Mariann Jacobsson, Vogue Scandinavia’s Head of Sustainability.

 

 

The fashion industry is notorious for its environmental footprint; Vogue Scandinavia is hence putting a heavy emphasis on how one can lead a more modern and sustainable fashion consumption. This is not only represented through the content of the magazine, but in all levels of the production chain. Vogue Scandinavia is transparent in their sustainable processes, from how the paper of the magazine is locally sourced and produced in the Finnish woods, to how they have cut out plastic wrapping and gone for a more environmentally-safe wood fibre packaging.

To further minimise waste and be more sustainable, Vogue Scandinavia will be the first edition of Vogue not to be sold in physical shops. Its 6 yearly issues are exclusively to be bought on the online Vogue Scandinavia platform. With the publishing industry becoming more digitalised, Vogue Scandinavia solely being represented online utilises the advantages of online platforms. Vogue Scandinavia aims to serve its readers as a three-dimensional experience consisting of look, smell and sound; scented paper and digitally sourced sound.

 

“We hope to inspire our stakeholders, industry colleagues, and our loyal readers to make small changes for good. A small step made by many people creates a movement, and we are proud to be leading this movement in our industry.”

– Mariann Jacobsson, Vogue Scandinavia’s Head of Sustainability.
 

Meet the Editors

Martina Bonnier

Martina Bonnier is the Editor-in-Chief at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Konca Aykan

Konca Aykan is the Fashion Director at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Allyson Shiffman

Allyson Shiffman is the Senior Fashion Writer at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Josefin Forsberg

Josefin Forsberg is the Junior Fashion Writer at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Camilla Larsson

Camilla Larsson is the Fashion Editor at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Rawdah Mohamed

Rawdah Mohamed is the Norwegian Fashion Editor at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Sophia Roe

Sophia Roe is the Danish Fashion Editor at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Natalie Setterwall

Natalie Setterwall is the Digital Editor at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Celine Aagaard

Celine Aagaard is the Sustainability Expert at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Asa Steinars

Asa Steinars is the Nature Expert at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Gucci Westman

Gucci Westman is the Beauty Expert at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Marianne Theodorsen

Marianne Theodorsen is the Handbag Expert at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Kristian Haagen

Kristian Haagen is the Watch Expert at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Sandra Hagelstam

Sandra Hagelstam is the Shoe Expert at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Mikko Puttonen

Mikko Puttonen is the Gender Fluidity Expert at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Mona M Ali

Mona M Ali is the Diversity & Inclusion Editor at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Tom Pattinson

Tom Pattinson is the Editorial Manager at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Jennifer Nilsson

Jennifer Nilsson is the Social & Commercial Media Editor at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

Rebecka Thorén

Rebecka Thorén is the Assistant to the Editor-in-Chief at Vogue Scandinavia.

 

 

How to reach the Editors

The editorial of Vogue Scandinavia is a wide variety of Editors and Experts, all prominent contacts within the Scandinavian fashion industry. VOCAST have gathered consent from the entire editorial and created a list solely dedicated to Vogue Scandinavia.

 

If you wish to subscribe to our Vogue Scandinavia list, please contact us here:

Sarah is the Lifestyle Researcher for the Danish market at VOCAST. She is very passionate about the fashion industry and along with her work at VOCAST she studies Communication at Copenhagen Business School.

Sara is the Norwegian Market Coordinator at VOCAST, responsible for Norwegian fashion and lifestyle research. When not at VOCAST, she studies Brand and Communications at Copenhagen Business School. Besides work and studies, she is a travel, music, and movie enthusiast.

 

Josefine is the Swedish Market Coordinator, responsible for the fashion and lifestyle research and coordination within the Swedish market. Alongside her work, at VOCAST she is finishing her studies in Communication Design & Media in Copenhagen.

 

 

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Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: The country of chocolate, fries, and … fashion. Maybe not as tasty, but surely more than tasteful. Martin Margiela, Dries Van Noten, Raf Simons, and Ann Demeulemeester are just a few of the big names who rose to fame from the country’s main cities Antwerp and Brussels. Interior design doesn’t need to hide in the fashion industry’s shadow though. Belgians tend to love building and decorating their homes. Now you only need to localize your contacts and link them to the right language … A quick guide on how to navigate this little, but extremely diverse and interesting country.

The Antwerp Six

Being such a small country, Belgium has still managed to put its stamp on the international fashion scene. Martin Margiela was a pioneer who rose to fame from Antwerp and you probably have heard of Raf Simons who’s been the creative director of Calvin Klein, Dior, and now Prada. Then names like Ann Demeulemeester and Dries Van Noten probably also ring a bell: Part of the Antwerp Six, highly influential graduates from Antwerp’s Royal Academy of Fine Arts.

Although Antwerp remains the Belgian fashion capital, the country’s actual capital definitely played and continues to play an important role in the country’s fashion history as a bustling city with creative ateliers and boutiques in the presence of inspiring artists like the surrealist René Magritte.

The popularity of Belgian fashion doesn’t reflect as much on its interior design. However, the saying goes that Belgians have a brick in their stomach’, pointing to their desire to build their own homes.

Needless to say that there is an audience for home interior products. According to a Santander market analysis, Belgians spend more than 6% of their household budget on their homes in the form of furnishings and maintenance, which is more than what they spend on fashion which trails behind with around 4%. Moreover, the report states that there’s a growing market for gastronomy, gardening, and home decoration and maintenance (1).

However, Belgium is a patchwork of languages, cultures, preferences, and attitudes, so it is hard to present a single, clear-cut profile and approach. Instead, we present you with some things to bear in mind when figuring out who you want to reach out to and from which locality in the country you’d best do this.

Highlights

1. Choose your language: Belgium has three official languages: Dutch, French, and German – but with Brussels being the capital of Europe, it’s not unlikely to catch some English there too.

Flanders, the northern and Dutch-speaking part of the country, has the biggest population (58%), Wallonia, the southern part, is less populated (31%) and is mainly French-speaking with a small German-speaking community in the east. Finally, the capital region Brussels (which is located in Flanders) has 11% of the population, and communication in the city tends to be in both main languages (Dutch and French).

The main cities are Antwerp and Brussels. Depending on which community they’re from, Belgians’ will have different preferences and habits – with Flemish people leaning closer to The Netherlands than the Walloons, and the latter being closer to the French landscape than the northern citizens.

Most websites catering to the Belgian market have both French and Dutch versions, which is very important. Belgians often shop and explore across the border, also virtually with about 40% of online sales originating abroad, mainly in The Netherlands, France, and Germany (2).

2. Build trust: As opposed to their neighbors in The Netherlands, Belgians are less direct, more formal, and reserved. They prefer to listen and take their time to build a more personal relationship with business partners before making a deal. Take this into account when reaching out to Belgian press or customers: They will appreciate an informal register as long as you’re not making too many spelling mistakes and you stick to business rather than superficial chit-chat.

3. Sustainability: Belgians are very climate-conscious. They love to support their local vendors and consume organic, fresh, traceable products. When you talk to them about your sustainable product or service, fun and fluff won’t cut it. Be sure to get your facts and terminology straight.

 

Familiarize with the Belgian media landscape

Included in VOCAST’s Belgium curated lists

Fashion media landscape

Home Inteior media landscape

Influencers

Compared to The Netherlands where social media penetration is very high at 88%, Belgium is growing and has more room for growth at 76% (3). The most popular platform is still Facebook with more than 81% users, followed by YouTube at 80%. Then Instagram has over 53% users, while Pinterest has about 30%.

TikTok grew massively: from barely 9% of the internet users on the platform in 2020 to 21,4% in 2021 (3). Although e-commerce is growing in Belgium, Santander notes that 25% of Belgian internet users have adblocks, which actually is as high as 47% for the younger population. As Santander writes in its report, Belgians are more likely to learn about products and services through social media and actively look for those.

Julie Vanlommel

Julie Vanlommel is a Belgian stylist and fashion influencer based in Antwerp.

Paulien Riemis

Paulien Riemis is the fashion influencer and writer of the blog Polienne. She’s based in Antwerp.

Florence Windey

Florence Windey is a Belgian influencer and radio personality hosting videos and shows for the channel StuBru.

Justine Kegels

Justine Kegels is an interior architect, designer, photographer, creative director, and model from Antwerp.

Patricia Goijens

Patricia Goijens is an interior photographer and stylist from Antwerp.

Elien Jansen

Elien Jansen is a fashion, travel, and lifestyle photographer and influencer based in Hasselt, Belgium.

 

Publishing houses

Belgian titles and channels are controlled by just a few large media houses. In Flanders these are DPG Media, Mediahuis and Roularta. The latter also holds French-speaking titles. In Wallonia Groupe Rossel is a major player.

There are the Dutch (VRT) and French-speaking (RTBF) public television and radio channels too, and in Wallonia, people tend to tap into French channels as well.

 

Meet some of the editors

Martyna Majchrzak

Martyna Majchrzak is the Editor in Chief for the Belgian culinary magazine Culinaire Ambiance. She is a micro-influencer sharing content about interior design, fashion and gastronomy. Based in Antwerp.

Marie Guérin

Marie Guérin is the Editor in Chief of Elle Belgique. 

Ruth Goossens

Ruth Goossens is the Editor in Chief of the Belgian lifestyle magazine Knack Weekend and its French edition Le Vif Weekend. 

Judith Hendrickx

Judith Hendrickx is the Head of Lifestyle for the Belgian lifestyle magazine Flair. She writes about interior, food and lifestyle. 

Mare Hotterbeekx

Mare Hotterbeekx is the digital coordinator for fashion and lifestyle magazine Knack Weekend. 

Amélie Rombauts

Amélie Rombauts is a design and architecture editor for the Belgian lifestyle magazine Knack Weekend. 

To get access to the Belgian curated lists of these Magazines, Influencers, Architects, Editors-in-chief, Editors, and more:

(1) https://santandertrade.com/en/portal/analyse-markets/belgium/reaching-the-consumers
(2) https://santandertrade.com/en/portal/analyse-markets/belgium/distributing-a-product
(3) https://www.xavierdegraux.be/sociale-netwerken-belgie-statistieken-2021

   

Wided is the Lifestyle Researcher for the Belgian and Dutch markets at VOCAST. She’s a Belgian editor and author with a background in journalism. In London, she established a career in digital marketing for fashion and interior design brands. When she’s not working or studying for her Master’s, you’ll find her in front of a canvas, paintbrushes in hand.

 

 

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The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Dutch Design is the national pride of The Netherlands and the subject of international praise. It is the umbrella term for the country’s design æsthetics and its popularity explains why VOCAST offers insights into the versatile market with a wide array of (niche) relevant contact segments. Dutch Design covers interior design and art, but The Netherlands are also important players in the global fashion scene. Now how should you best engage with this market of which the residents are characterized by their authenticity and direct attitude? A quick, clear guide to Dutch (Design) thinking.

Dutch Design

Dutch Design is more than just a reference to its country of origin. The term covers Dutch interior design and art æsthetics and is known for being innovative, minimalistic, experimental, quirky, and humorous.

When it comes to innovation, sustainability has come to take up a bigger role. After all, Dutch design is characterized by offering more than just a practical purpose: it tells a story. Great contemporary examples of furniture and interior design brands carrying out the Dutch spirit are Studio HENK, Home Stock, Zuiver, and Moooi.

But the country leaves a mark on the fashion world too. Think of Daily Paper which is one of the most influential streetwear brands of the moment. Great designers like Iris van Herpen and Viktor & Rolf paved the way.

Moreover, Dutch brands like Oilily, G-Star, and Scotch & Soda became part of the mainstream. In fact, according to Creative Holland, the Dutch fashion industry employs more than 20.000 people and covers a consumer market of around 10 billion euros. The country counts more than 20.000 physical stores and customers get their hands on their favorite designs through online channels more than ever too (1).

Yet, there isn’t one ultimate Dutch fashion identity, Maaike Feitsma argued in her 2014 research. It is always changing and developing, moving between the stereotype of functionality, simplicity in line with the Dutch adversity for showing off, and the seemingly opposing bright, colorful, and expressive style (2).

Despite the mix of both overlapping and contradicting styles, there are elements that connect and characterize the Dutch and their design. Bearing those in mind, we proceed with a little guide to Dutch communication.

How to engage

The Netherlands topped the global 2020 EF English Proficiency Index (3) which means that the Dutch are the best non-native English speakers, they also have a long and rich history in international trade and love online shopping in foreign webshops (4).

But this doesn’t mean you can kick up your feet and let the magic happen. If you want to conquer the Dutch market (and hearts), you’ll have to embrace the Dutch attitude and answer their need for authenticity and directness:

1. Honesty is key

The Dutch are known to be very direct and appreciate it when others make themselves clear in simple terms too. So in your messaging targeting The Netherlands, be sure to simply get to the point, no fluff. When emailing your Dutch contacts, you can address them informally as the informal register is gaining popularity.

Only if your customer base is older or you know they prefer a formal approach, you can choose for that (5). Moreover, the Dutch don’t show off, nor do they like it when others do. Don’t take yourself too seriously, add a touch of humor as long as the communication stays straightforward. People don’t tend to invest in luxury items to show how wealthy they are, it is more a matter of taste and self-expression. Be sure to focus on the latter with an authentic, honest story and you’ll have loyal customers in return.

2. Be on time

When it comes to managing their time, Dutch people are very strict. They rarely work overtime and they like to plan social gatherings weeks in advance. Because about a third of the Dutch start their day by checking their emails, this is a great way to get in touch. However, if you want to invite someone to an event and actually want them to show up, make sure to ask them largely ahead of time so they can make space for you in their calendar – people aren’t too keen on canceling plans last minute (5).

3. Stand for something

The Netherlands is the second-largest agricultural exporter in the world, which means sustainability is quite naturally on their mind. However, figures show that the Dutch are lagging behind globally when it comes to making sustainable choices – simply because they don’t necessarily want to pay more for it than for other products and services (5).

Because it’s nonetheless an important matter to the Dutch, you can focus eg. on the packaging. Pwc’s March 2021 Global Consumer Insights Pulse Survey’s section on sustainability, shows the highest commitment of the Dutch when it comes to intentionally buying items with eco-friendly or less packaging (38%) and buying items from companies conscious and supportive of protecting the environment (35%) (6).

This reminds us of the importance of a brand’s narrative in The Netherlands.

 

Familiarize with the Dutch media landscape

Included in VOCAST’s Dutch curated lists

Fashion media landscape

Home Interior media landscape

Influencers

With the rise in online shopping comes the growing relevance of influencer marketing. Even before the pandemic, some influencers grew out to become true celebrities, think of eg. the Dutch-Iranian beauty entrepreneur, presenter, and fashion blogger Anna Nooshin (near 1 million followers), or YouTube make-up star NikkieTutorials (14.7 million followers).

Lockdowns and social distancing definitely also helped the social network TikTok reach amazing heights. According to Emerce, in The Netherlands, it went from 2 million to 4.5 million users in the past year alone (7). If you want to find out more on how to reach a broader audience and include more of Gen Z, read our TikTok feature and explore our curated TikTok lists.

When communicating with a Dutch audience on social media, it’s important to keep the previously mentioned pointers in mind. Unfiltered content is a big win in The Netherlands. Think of influencer Rianne Meijer, now part of Zalando’s Activists of Optimism campaign. She’s a great example of Dutch authenticity mixed with a good dose of fun with her Instagram vs. reality content.

A general development, again quite driven by Gen Z voices, is the use of their social platforms to bring positive change, communicating and doing something meaningful (7). As previously mentioned, as a brand you can stand out if you stand for something and you can connect with influencers who relate to your message and ideas.

Despite being a bit behind on the global sustainability movement, The Netherlands does have some influencers with a climate-conscious voice, whom you can find in our niche curated lists too. For eg., Nina Pierson shares authentic content about motherhood.

Negin Mirsalehi

Negin Mirsalehi is one of the most successful Dutch influencers and became an equally successful entrepreneur as she launched her own haircare brand Gisou, based on honey, in 2015. She even made it into Forbes’ 30 under 30.

Rianne Meijer

Rianne Meijer is a Dutch model with a passion for photography, traveling, and making video content along the way.

Vivian Hoorn

Vivian Hoorn is a visual storyteller based in Amsterdam. She’s a fashion and lifestyle photographer and creative director.

Maartje Diepstraten

Maartje Diepstraten is the Dutch creative mastermind behind Barts Boekje (‘Bart’s Guide’, the former being a nickname given to her by her father). The blog has developed several categories ranging from kids guides to travel and (green) interior – all within the lifestyle and travel field.

 

Andrea de Groot

Andrea de Groot is a content creator and the founder of interior blog LivingHip.

 

Rachel van Sas

Rachel van Sas is a Dutch influencer living in Amsterdam. She has a big passion for interior design which she shares on her social channels.

 

 

Publishing houses

The Dutch media landscape is dominated by five big players: the Dutch public broadcaster NPO, DPG Media which used to be De Persgroep, and since April 2020 also owns Sanoma Media, Talpa Network, Mediahuis, and RTL Group. These large companies own most of the Dutch media brands, including the most popular news services NU.nl, NOS, AD, De Telegraaf, and RTL Nieuws (8).

However, only two of them – the Belgian Mediahuis and DPG Media – hold more than 85% of the print market, while three players hold around 75% of the radio and television markets.

 

Meet some of the editors

Evelien Reich

Evelien Reich is the Editor in Chief of the Dutch ELLE Decoration and ELLE à Table NL. She’s also been a stylist for several decades working for Quote, ELLE Eten, ELLE Decoration, Red, and FD Persoonlijk.

Mary Hessing

Mary Hessing is art director and editor at WOTH Wonderful Things magazine. She previously worked for the women’s lifestyle magazine Libelle and was the Editor in Chief of both More Than Classic and Eigen Huis & Interieur. Next to interior design, she’s worked in fashion organising shows, books and events. 

Suzanne Arbeid

Suzanne Arbeid is based in Amsterdam and coordinates the specials for the Dutch lifestyle magazine Margriet. She was previously the deputy Editor in Chief of Grazia Netherlands. 

Monique van Loon

Monique van Loon is a Dutch author and food critic living in Amsterdam. She reviews restaurants for Het Parool, writes for the Dutch ELLE Decoration and was formerly co-founder of Culy.nl, Editor in Chief of Girlscene.nl and an editor for various Dutch titles.

Stephanie Broek

Stephanie Broek is a Dutch fashion journalist, writer, consultant and influencer, with a love for sustainability. She was formerly the Fashion Features Editor at Glamour NL. 

To get access to the Dutch curated lists of these Magazines, Influencers, Architects, Editors-in-chief, Editors, and more:

(1) https://www.creativeholland.com/nl/fashion-en-textiel
(2) https://nederlands.ruhosting.nl/wat-is-typisch-nederlands-aan-nederlandse-mode-promotie/
(3) https://www.ef.com/wwen/epi/
(4) https://www.wordbank.com/us/blog/market-insights/dutch-consumer-behavior/
(5) https://www.wordbank.com/us/blog/market-insights/dutch-consumer-behavior/
(6) https://www.pwc.com/gx/en/industries/consumer-markets/consumer-insights-survey.html
(7) https://www.emerce.nl/achtergrond/influencer-marketing-2021-7-belangrijkste-trends
(8) https://www.consultancy.nl/nieuws/24543/de-grootste-mediabedrijven-van-nederland-en-ter-wereld

   

Wided is the Lifestyle Researcher for the Belgian and Dutch markets at VOCAST. She’s a Belgian editor and author with a background in journalism. In London, she established a career in digital marketing for fashion and interior design brands. When she’s not working or studying for her Master’s, you’ll find her in front of a canvas, paintbrushes in hand.

 

 

 

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Vogue Scandinavia

Vogue Scandinavia

This August, the highly anticipated Vogue Scandinavia was launched. Comprising a whole region, the edition covers the Nordic countries of Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. The magazine aims to be an emblem of modern Nordic fashion, combining elements from...

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

Norway is one of the selected markets coordinated by VOCAST. On our platform, you can find curated lists within fashion, home interior, and lifestyle to help you conquer the Norwegian market. Here are which tendencies and traditions currently shape the consumption patterns in the Nordic country:

A growing market

Although the Norwegian market is smaller than its Scandinavian neighbors Sweden and Denmark, the country has a significant impact across lifestyle markets. As the capital, the biggest city, and business center, Oslo naturally serves as the country’s fashion and interior central. Oslo has been reported by Vogue to be a fastly growing style destination, and its fashion week, Oslo Runway has gathered the attention of a large international fashion audience.

As more and more acknowledged, recognizable brands emerge, and with Scandinavian design in the spotlight, we can only expect to see more of Norway as a fashion destination. Additionally, as part of the Scandinavian region, Norway has well-established traditions when it comes to home interior. The nation is home to several design classics, for instance, Brattrud’s Scandia chair, that remain prevalent to this day.

Norwegians are avid spenders on fashion and home interior

Norwegians are avid shoppers and spend a large amount of their income on updating their wardrobes. They also invest in their home environments: Norwegians are world-leading when it comes to home renovations and improvements.

This is both due to a large homeownership ratio and a nationwide interest in interior design. Within recent years, certain new and notable consumption tendencies have emerged. Norwegian consumers are becoming increasingly aware of the environmental footprint of their choices, leading many to value sustainable materials and brands more than before.

We can thus see a slight shift away from the traditional mass consumption of fast fashion, to an increasing desire to invest in pieces that will last season after season. Norwegians have an increasing interest in knowing where the products they buy are sourced, and the story and vision behind them. Brands can thus benefit from having a transparent communication of vision and values.

Traditions persist

Moreover, being a country deeply rooted in outdoor nature traditions, Norwegians appreciate functionality and durability, both in their clothing and home goods. This is needed to tackle the Nordic climate and maintain flexibility to complete everyday life duties.

The more functional and purposeful a piece of clothing is, the more likely it is to be worn again and again. As reuse and repurpose of clothing is ever-growing, this will be a growing tendency within the market. This is reflected in the large amount of highly valued sportswear brands rooted in Norway.

Familiarize with the Norwegian media landscape

Included in VOCAST’s Norwegian curated lists

 

Well-established influencers

Compared to its modest population, Norway has an established influencer scene. Norwegians are generally savvy with technology and digital media; digital influencers have therefore had a prominent role in the media landscape for over a decade.

Nowadays, most influencers have shifted from the traditional blog platform, which previously was the go-to channel, to mainly focus on Instagram. Here, the scene is rich and boasts a large selection of voices with significant reach and influence.

Among the younger and more newly established forces, TikTok has become the platform from which the largest audience is gained. Ultimately, the Norwegian influencer landscape is certainly one to keep an eye on many profiles that have a large, international following while still maintaining a solid footing and influence over the Norwegian lifestyle market.

This is exemplified through the model, influencer, and vocal advocate Rawdah Mohamed, who has used her platform to establish herself in the fashion industry while simultaneously speaking her mind. She was in 2021 appointed the prestigious position as the Norwegian Fashion Editor at Vogue Scandinavia, making her one of the most powerful profiles in the Norwegian fashion industry.

Annabel Rosendahl

Annabel Rosendahl has an established name in the Norwegian fashion landscape. A street style photography favorite, she frequents Fashion Weeks all over the world. She has a dynamic style, mixing bold patterns and colors with classic silhouettes.

Anniken Jørgensen

Anniken Jørgensen, also known as Annijor, has been one of Norway’s most impactful influencers for years. With her large audience, Anniken has established herself as a prominent fashionista, entrepreneur and trendsetter.

 

Renate Larsen Lorentzen

Renate Larsen Lorentzen, known under her handle @casachicks, has amassed a solid following on her Instagram, with which she shares daily home improvement inspiration. Also an interior stylist, she uses her expertise to showcase how to upgrade one’s home.

 

Inger-Lise Lillerovde

Inger-Lise Lillerovde is a renowned interior designer, stylist and influencer. Her home captures what one can categorize as quentessential Norwegian: a sleek, minimalist residence surrounded by astonishing nature.

 

Connections are key

The Norwegian lifestyle media landscape is small and interrelated. Many of the biggest magazines are owned by a few, large publishing houses. Therefore, if you get in touch with one editor, the road is short to become acquainted with more. Some editors manage numerous magazines at once and are therefore heavily connected contacts worth keeping an eye on.

Additionally, the Norwegian publishing sector is eminently connected with those of Sweden and Denmark. This is evident through publications like the newly established Vogue Scandinavia, which is scheduled to launch in August 2021.

Fashion Magazines

The fashion media landscape is currently characterized by a few, large print publications, including Costume and ELLE. You can also find a selection of online magazines offering daily fashion news. Find these and more in our curated lists.

Home Interior Magazines

You can find several home interior magazines with significant reach and readership. Browse our overview to find magazines focusing on designing your home, cabin, garden, and more.

Meet some of the editors

Kine B. Hartz

Kine B. Hartz is a leading figure in the Norwegian fashion media landscape. As the Editor-in-Chief of the country’s biggest fashion magazine, Costume, she has a solid impact on the industry.

 

Rawdah Mohamed

Rawdah Mohamed is an established influencer and model, and is from fall 2021 set to be Vogue Scandinavia’s Norwegian Fashion Editor. She is regarded as one of the Norwegian fashion industry’s most powerful profiles, and has captured the attention from a worldwide audience.

 

Cecilie Jørgensen

Cecilie Jørgensen is the Editor-in-Chief of the Norwegian home interior magazine BO BEDRE.

 

Kriss Daatland

Kriss Daatland is the Editor-in-Chief of Bonytt, Norway’s biggest home interior magazine.

 

 

To get access to the Norwegian curated lists of these Magazines, Influencers, Stylists, Editors-in-chief, Editors, and more

   

Sara is the Norwegian Market Coordinator at VOCAST, responsible for Norwegian fashion and lifestyle research. When not at VOCAST, she studies Brand and Communications at Copenhagen Business School. Besides work and studies, she is a travel, music and movie enthusiast.

 

 

 

 

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