Facebook
Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: The country of chocolate, fries, and … fashion. Maybe not as tasty, but surely more than tasteful. Martin Margiela, Dries Van Noten, Raf Simons, and Ann Demeulemeester are just a few of the big names who rose to fame from the country’s main cities Antwerp and Brussels. Interior design doesn’t need to hide in the fashion industry’s shadow though. Belgians tend to love building and decorating their homes. Now you only need to localize your contacts and link them to the right language … A quick guide on how to navigate this little, but extremely diverse and interesting country.

The Antwerp Six

Being such a small country, Belgium has still managed to put its stamp on the international fashion scene. Martin Margiela was a pioneer who rose to fame from Antwerp and you probably have heard of Raf Simons who’s been the creative director of Calvin Klein, Dior, and now Prada. Then names like Ann Demeulemeester and Dries Van Noten probably also ring a bell: Part of the Antwerp Six, highly influential graduates from Antwerp’s Royal Academy of Fine Arts.

Although Antwerp remains the Belgian fashion capital, the country’s actual capital definitely played and continues to play an important role in the country’s fashion history as a bustling city with creative ateliers and boutiques in the presence of inspiring artists like the surrealist René Magritte.

The popularity of Belgian fashion doesn’t reflect as much on its interior design. However, the saying goes that Belgians have a brick in their stomach’, pointing to their desire to build their own homes.

Needless to say that there is an audience for home interior products. According to a Santander market analysis, Belgians spend more than 6% of their household budget on their homes in the form of furnishings and maintenance, which is more than what they spend on fashion which trails behind with around 4%. Moreover, the report states that there’s a growing market for gastronomy, gardening, and home decoration and maintenance (1).

However, Belgium is a patchwork of languages, cultures, preferences, and attitudes, so it is hard to present a single, clear-cut profile and approach. Instead, we present you with some things to bear in mind when figuring out who you want to reach out to and from which locality in the country you’d best do this.

Highlights

1. Choose your language: Belgium has three official languages: Dutch, French, and German – but with Brussels being the capital of Europe, it’s not unlikely to catch some English there too.

Flanders, the northern and Dutch-speaking part of the country, has the biggest population (58%), Wallonia, the southern part, is less populated (31%) and is mainly French-speaking with a small German-speaking community in the east. Finally, the capital region Brussels (which is located in Flanders) has 11% of the population, and communication in the city tends to be in both main languages (Dutch and French).

The main cities are Antwerp and Brussels. Depending on which community they’re from, Belgians’ will have different preferences and habits – with Flemish people leaning closer to The Netherlands than the Walloons, and the latter being closer to the French landscape than the northern citizens.

Most websites catering to the Belgian market have both French and Dutch versions, which is very important. Belgians often shop and explore across the border, also virtually with about 40% of online sales originating abroad, mainly in The Netherlands, France, and Germany (2).

2. Build trust: As opposed to their neighbors in The Netherlands, Belgians are less direct, more formal, and reserved. They prefer to listen and take their time to build a more personal relationship with business partners before making a deal. Take this into account when reaching out to Belgian press or customers: They will appreciate an informal register as long as you’re not making too many spelling mistakes and you stick to business rather than superficial chit-chat.

3. Sustainability: Belgians are very climate-conscious. They love to support their local vendors and consume organic, fresh, traceable products. When you talk to them about your sustainable product or service, fun and fluff won’t cut it. Be sure to get your facts and terminology straight.

 

Familiarize with the Belgian media landscape

Included in VOCAST’s Belgium curated lists

Fashion media landscape

Home Inteior media landscape

Influencers

Compared to The Netherlands where social media penetration is very high at 88%, Belgium is growing and has more room for growth at 76% (3). The most popular platform is still Facebook with more than 81% users, followed by YouTube at 80%. Then Instagram has over 53% users, while Pinterest has about 30%.

TikTok grew massively: from barely 9% of the internet users on the platform in 2020 to 21,4% in 2021 (3). Although e-commerce is growing in Belgium, Santander notes that 25% of Belgian internet users have adblocks, which actually is as high as 47% for the younger population. As Santander writes in its report, Belgians are more likely to learn about products and services through social media and actively look for those.

Julie Vanlommel

Julie Vanlommel is a Belgian stylist and fashion influencer based in Antwerp.

Paulien Riemis

Paulien Riemis is the fashion influencer and writer of the blog Polienne. She’s based in Antwerp.

Florence Windey

Florence Windey is a Belgian influencer and radio personality hosting videos and shows for the channel StuBru.

Justine Kegels

Justine Kegels is an interior architect, designer, photographer, creative director, and model from Antwerp.

Patricia Goijens

Patricia Goijens is an interior photographer and stylist from Antwerp.

Elien Jansen

Elien Jansen is a fashion, travel, and lifestyle photographer and influencer based in Hasselt, Belgium.

 

Publishing houses

Belgian titles and channels are controlled by just a few large media houses. In Flanders these are DPG Media, Mediahuis and Roularta. The latter also holds French-speaking titles. In Wallonia Groupe Rossel is a major player.

There are the Dutch (VRT) and French-speaking (RTBF) public television and radio channels too, and in Wallonia, people tend to tap into French channels as well.

 

Meet some of the editors

Martyna Majchrzak

Martyna Majchrzak is the Editor in Chief for the Belgian culinary magazine Culinaire Ambiance. She is a micro-influencer sharing content about interior design, fashion and gastronomy. Based in Antwerp.

Marie Guérin

Marie Guérin is the Editor in Chief of Elle Belgique. 

Ruth Goossens

Ruth Goossens is the Editor in Chief of the Belgian lifestyle magazine Knack Weekend and its French edition Le Vif Weekend. 

Judith Hendrickx

Judith Hendrickx is the Head of Lifestyle for the Belgian lifestyle magazine Flair. She writes about interior, food and lifestyle. 

Mare Hotterbeekx

Mare Hotterbeekx is the digital coordinator for fashion and lifestyle magazine Knack Weekend. 

Amélie Rombauts

Amélie Rombauts is a design and architecture editor for the Belgian lifestyle magazine Knack Weekend. 

To get access to the Belgian curated lists of these Magazines, Influencers, Architects, Editors-in-chief, Editors, and more:

(1) https://santandertrade.com/en/portal/analyse-markets/belgium/reaching-the-consumers
(2) https://santandertrade.com/en/portal/analyse-markets/belgium/distributing-a-product
(3) https://www.xavierdegraux.be/sociale-netwerken-belgie-statistieken-2021

   

Wided is the Lifestyle Researcher for the Belgian and Dutch markets at VOCAST. She’s a Belgian editor and author with a background in journalism. In London, she established a career in digital marketing for fashion and interior design brands. When she’s not working or studying for her Master’s, you’ll find her in front of a canvas, paintbrushes in hand.

 

 

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Get free knowledge on how to optimize your B2B marketing & new product releases.

RELATED POSTS

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: The country of chocolate, fries, and … fashion. Maybe not as tasty, but surely more than tasteful. Martin Margiela, Dries Van Noten, Raf Simons, and Ann Demeulemeester are just a few of the big names who rose to fame from the country’s main cities Antwerp and...

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Dutch Design is the national pride of The Netherlands and the subject of international praise. It is the umbrella term for the country’s design æsthetics and its popularity explains why VOCAST offers insights into the versatile market with a wide array of (niche)...

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

Norway is one of the selected markets coordinated by VOCAST. On our platform, you can find curated lists within fashion, home interior, and lifestyle to help you conquer the Norwegian market. Here are which tendencies and traditions currently shape the consumption...

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Dutch Design is the national pride of The Netherlands and the subject of international praise. It is the umbrella term for the country’s design æsthetics and its popularity explains why VOCAST offers insights into the versatile market with a wide array of (niche) relevant contact segments. Dutch Design covers interior design and art, but The Netherlands are also important players in the global fashion scene. Now how should you best engage with this market of which the residents are characterized by their authenticity and direct attitude? A quick, clear guide to Dutch (Design) thinking.

Dutch Design

Dutch Design is more than just a reference to its country of origin. The term covers Dutch interior design and art æsthetics and is known for being innovative, minimalistic, experimental, quirky, and humorous.

When it comes to innovation, sustainability has come to take up a bigger role. After all, Dutch design is characterized by offering more than just a practical purpose: it tells a story. Great contemporary examples of furniture and interior design brands carrying out the Dutch spirit are Studio HENK, Home Stock, Zuiver, and Moooi.

But the country leaves a mark on the fashion world too. Think of Daily Paper which is one of the most influential streetwear brands of the moment. Great designers like Iris van Herpen and Viktor & Rolf paved the way.

Moreover, Dutch brands like Oilily, G-Star, and Scotch & Soda became part of the mainstream. In fact, according to Creative Holland, the Dutch fashion industry employs more than 20.000 people and covers a consumer market of around 10 billion euros. The country counts more than 20.000 physical stores and customers get their hands on their favorite designs through online channels more than ever too (1).

Yet, there isn’t one ultimate Dutch fashion identity, Maaike Feitsma argued in her 2014 research. It is always changing and developing, moving between the stereotype of functionality, simplicity in line with the Dutch adversity for showing off, and the seemingly opposing bright, colorful, and expressive style (2).

Despite the mix of both overlapping and contradicting styles, there are elements that connect and characterize the Dutch and their design. Bearing those in mind, we proceed with a little guide to Dutch communication.

How to engage

The Netherlands topped the global 2020 EF English Proficiency Index (3) which means that the Dutch are the best non-native English speakers, they also have a long and rich history in international trade and love online shopping in foreign webshops (4).

But this doesn’t mean you can kick up your feet and let the magic happen. If you want to conquer the Dutch market (and hearts), you’ll have to embrace the Dutch attitude and answer their need for authenticity and directness:

1. Honesty is key

The Dutch are known to be very direct and appreciate it when others make themselves clear in simple terms too. So in your messaging targeting The Netherlands, be sure to simply get to the point, no fluff. When emailing your Dutch contacts, you can address them informally as the informal register is gaining popularity.

Only if your customer base is older or you know they prefer a formal approach, you can choose for that (5). Moreover, the Dutch don’t show off, nor do they like it when others do. Don’t take yourself too seriously, add a touch of humor as long as the communication stays straightforward. People don’t tend to invest in luxury items to show how wealthy they are, it is more a matter of taste and self-expression. Be sure to focus on the latter with an authentic, honest story and you’ll have loyal customers in return.

2. Be on time

When it comes to managing their time, Dutch people are very strict. They rarely work overtime and they like to plan social gatherings weeks in advance. Because about a third of the Dutch start their day by checking their emails, this is a great way to get in touch. However, if you want to invite someone to an event and actually want them to show up, make sure to ask them largely ahead of time so they can make space for you in their calendar – people aren’t too keen on canceling plans last minute (5).

3. Stand for something

The Netherlands is the second-largest agricultural exporter in the world, which means sustainability is quite naturally on their mind. However, figures show that the Dutch are lagging behind globally when it comes to making sustainable choices – simply because they don’t necessarily want to pay more for it than for other products and services (5).

Because it’s nonetheless an important matter to the Dutch, you can focus eg. on the packaging. Pwc’s March 2021 Global Consumer Insights Pulse Survey’s section on sustainability, shows the highest commitment of the Dutch when it comes to intentionally buying items with eco-friendly or less packaging (38%) and buying items from companies conscious and supportive of protecting the environment (35%) (6).

This reminds us of the importance of a brand’s narrative in The Netherlands.

 

Familiarize with the Dutch media landscape

Included in VOCAST’s Dutch curated lists

Fashion media landscape

Home Interior media landscape

Influencers

With the rise in online shopping comes the growing relevance of influencer marketing. Even before the pandemic, some influencers grew out to become true celebrities, think of eg. the Dutch-Iranian beauty entrepreneur, presenter, and fashion blogger Anna Nooshin (near 1 million followers), or YouTube make-up star NikkieTutorials (14.7 million followers).

Lockdowns and social distancing definitely also helped the social network TikTok reach amazing heights. According to Emerce, in The Netherlands, it went from 2 million to 4.5 million users in the past year alone (7). If you want to find out more on how to reach a broader audience and include more of Gen Z, read our TikTok feature and explore our curated TikTok lists.

When communicating with a Dutch audience on social media, it’s important to keep the previously mentioned pointers in mind. Unfiltered content is a big win in The Netherlands. Think of influencer Rianne Meijer, now part of Zalando’s Activists of Optimism campaign. She’s a great example of Dutch authenticity mixed with a good dose of fun with her Instagram vs. reality content.

A general development, again quite driven by Gen Z voices, is the use of their social platforms to bring positive change, communicating and doing something meaningful (7). As previously mentioned, as a brand you can stand out if you stand for something and you can connect with influencers who relate to your message and ideas.

Despite being a bit behind on the global sustainability movement, The Netherlands does have some influencers with a climate-conscious voice, whom you can find in our niche curated lists too. For eg., Nina Pierson shares authentic content about motherhood.

Negin Mirsalehi

Negin Mirsalehi is one of the most successful Dutch influencers and became an equally successful entrepreneur as she launched her own haircare brand Gisou, based on honey, in 2015. She even made it into Forbes’ 30 under 30.

Rianne Meijer

Rianne Meijer is a Dutch model with a passion for photography, traveling, and making video content along the way.

Vivian Hoorn

Vivian Hoorn is a visual storyteller based in Amsterdam. She’s a fashion and lifestyle photographer and creative director.

Maartje Diepstraten

Maartje Diepstraten is the Dutch creative mastermind behind Barts Boekje (‘Bart’s Guide’, the former being a nickname given to her by her father). The blog has developed several categories ranging from kids guides to travel and (green) interior – all within the lifestyle and travel field.

 

Andrea de Groot

Andrea de Groot is a content creator and the founder of interior blog LivingHip.

 

Rachel van Sas

Rachel van Sas is a Dutch influencer living in Amsterdam. She has a big passion for interior design which she shares on her social channels.

 

 

Publishing houses

The Dutch media landscape is dominated by five big players: the Dutch public broadcaster NPO, DPG Media which used to be De Persgroep, and since April 2020 also owns Sanoma Media, Talpa Network, Mediahuis, and RTL Group. These large companies own most of the Dutch media brands, including the most popular news services NU.nl, NOS, AD, De Telegraaf, and RTL Nieuws (8).

However, only two of them – the Belgian Mediahuis and DPG Media – hold more than 85% of the print market, while three players hold around 75% of the radio and television markets.

 

Meet some of the editors

Evelien Reich

Evelien Reich is the Editor in Chief of the Dutch ELLE Decoration and ELLE à Table NL. She’s also been a stylist for several decades working for Quote, ELLE Eten, ELLE Decoration, Red, and FD Persoonlijk.

Mary Hessing

Mary Hessing is art director and editor at WOTH Wonderful Things magazine. She previously worked for the women’s lifestyle magazine Libelle and was the Editor in Chief of both More Than Classic and Eigen Huis & Interieur. Next to interior design, she’s worked in fashion organising shows, books and events. 

Suzanne Arbeid

Suzanne Arbeid is based in Amsterdam and coordinates the specials for the Dutch lifestyle magazine Margriet. She was previously the deputy Editor in Chief of Grazia Netherlands. 

Monique van Loon

Monique van Loon is a Dutch author and food critic living in Amsterdam. She reviews restaurants for Het Parool, writes for the Dutch ELLE Decoration and was formerly co-founder of Culy.nl, Editor in Chief of Girlscene.nl and an editor for various Dutch titles.

Stephanie Broek

Stephanie Broek is a Dutch fashion journalist, writer, consultant and influencer, with a love for sustainability. She was formerly the Fashion Features Editor at Glamour NL. 

To get access to the Dutch curated lists of these Magazines, Influencers, Architects, Editors-in-chief, Editors, and more:

(1) https://www.creativeholland.com/nl/fashion-en-textiel
(2) https://nederlands.ruhosting.nl/wat-is-typisch-nederlands-aan-nederlandse-mode-promotie/
(3) https://www.ef.com/wwen/epi/
(4) https://www.wordbank.com/us/blog/market-insights/dutch-consumer-behavior/
(5) https://www.wordbank.com/us/blog/market-insights/dutch-consumer-behavior/
(6) https://www.pwc.com/gx/en/industries/consumer-markets/consumer-insights-survey.html
(7) https://www.emerce.nl/achtergrond/influencer-marketing-2021-7-belangrijkste-trends
(8) https://www.consultancy.nl/nieuws/24543/de-grootste-mediabedrijven-van-nederland-en-ter-wereld

   

Wided is the Lifestyle Researcher for the Belgian and Dutch markets at VOCAST. She’s a Belgian editor and author with a background in journalism. In London, she established a career in digital marketing for fashion and interior design brands. When she’s not working or studying for her Master’s, you’ll find her in front of a canvas, paintbrushes in hand.

 

 

 

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Get free knowledge on how to optimize your B2B marketing & new product releases.

RELATED POSTS

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: The country of chocolate, fries, and … fashion. Maybe not as tasty, but surely more than tasteful. Martin Margiela, Dries Van Noten, Raf Simons, and Ann Demeulemeester are just a few of the big names who rose to fame from the country’s main cities Antwerp and...

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Dutch Design is the national pride of The Netherlands and the subject of international praise. It is the umbrella term for the country’s design æsthetics and its popularity explains why VOCAST offers insights into the versatile market with a wide array of (niche)...

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

Norway is one of the selected markets coordinated by VOCAST. On our platform, you can find curated lists within fashion, home interior, and lifestyle to help you conquer the Norwegian market. Here are which tendencies and traditions currently shape the consumption...

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

Norway is one of the selected markets coordinated by VOCAST. On our platform, you can find curated lists within fashion, home interior, and lifestyle to help you conquer the Norwegian market. Here are which tendencies and traditions currently shape the consumption patterns in the Nordic country:

A growing market

Although the Norwegian market is smaller than its Scandinavian neighbors Sweden and Denmark, the country has a significant impact across lifestyle markets. As the capital, the biggest city, and business center, Oslo naturally serves as the country’s fashion and interior central. Oslo has been reported by Vogue to be a fastly growing style destination, and its fashion week, Oslo Runway has gathered the attention of a large international fashion audience.

As more and more acknowledged, recognizable brands emerge, and with Scandinavian design in the spotlight, we can only expect to see more of Norway as a fashion destination. Additionally, as part of the Scandinavian region, Norway has well-established traditions when it comes to home interior. The nation is home to several design classics, for instance, Brattrud’s Scandia chair, that remain prevalent to this day.

Norwegians are avid spenders on fashion and home interior

Norwegians are avid shoppers and spend a large amount of their income on updating their wardrobes. They also invest in their home environments: Norwegians are world-leading when it comes to home renovations and improvements.

This is both due to a large homeownership ratio and a nationwide interest in interior design. Within recent years, certain new and notable consumption tendencies have emerged. Norwegian consumers are becoming increasingly aware of the environmental footprint of their choices, leading many to value sustainable materials and brands more than before.

We can thus see a slight shift away from the traditional mass consumption of fast fashion, to an increasing desire to invest in pieces that will last season after season. Norwegians have an increasing interest in knowing where the products they buy are sourced, and the story and vision behind them. Brands can thus benefit from having a transparent communication of vision and values.

Traditions persist

Moreover, being a country deeply rooted in outdoor nature traditions, Norwegians appreciate functionality and durability, both in their clothing and home goods. This is needed to tackle the Nordic climate and maintain flexibility to complete everyday life duties.

The more functional and purposeful a piece of clothing is, the more likely it is to be worn again and again. As reuse and repurpose of clothing is ever-growing, this will be a growing tendency within the market. This is reflected in the large amount of highly valued sportswear brands rooted in Norway.

Familiarize with the Norwegian media landscape

Included in VOCAST’s Norwegian curated lists

 

Well-established influencers

Compared to its modest population, Norway has an established influencer scene. Norwegians are generally savvy with technology and digital media; digital influencers have therefore had a prominent role in the media landscape for over a decade.

Nowadays, most influencers have shifted from the traditional blog platform, which previously was the go-to channel, to mainly focus on Instagram. Here, the scene is rich and boasts a large selection of voices with significant reach and influence.

Among the younger and more newly established forces, TikTok has become the platform from which the largest audience is gained. Ultimately, the Norwegian influencer landscape is certainly one to keep an eye on many profiles that have a large, international following while still maintaining a solid footing and influence over the Norwegian lifestyle market.

This is exemplified through the model, influencer, and vocal advocate Rawdah Mohamed, who has used her platform to establish herself in the fashion industry while simultaneously speaking her mind. She was in 2021 appointed the prestigious position as the Norwegian Fashion Editor at Vogue Scandinavia, making her one of the most powerful profiles in the Norwegian fashion industry.

Annabel Rosendahl

Annabel Rosendahl has an established name in the Norwegian fashion landscape. A street style photography favorite, she frequents Fashion Weeks all over the world. She has a dynamic style, mixing bold patterns and colors with classic silhouettes.

Anniken Jørgensen

Anniken Jørgensen, also known as Annijor, has been one of Norway’s most impactful influencers for years. With her large audience, Anniken has established herself as a prominent fashionista, entrepreneur and trendsetter.

 

Renate Larsen Lorentzen

Renate Larsen Lorentzen, known under her handle @casachicks, has amassed a solid following on her Instagram, with which she shares daily home improvement inspiration. Also an interior stylist, she uses her expertise to showcase how to upgrade one’s home.

 

Inger-Lise Lillerovde

Inger-Lise Lillerovde is a renowned interior designer, stylist and influencer. Her home captures what one can categorize as quentessential Norwegian: a sleek, minimalist residence surrounded by astonishing nature.

 

Connections are key

The Norwegian lifestyle media landscape is small and interrelated. Many of the biggest magazines are owned by a few, large publishing houses. Therefore, if you get in touch with one editor, the road is short to become acquainted with more. Some editors manage numerous magazines at once and are therefore heavily connected contacts worth keeping an eye on.

Additionally, the Norwegian publishing sector is eminently connected with those of Sweden and Denmark. This is evident through publications like the newly established Vogue Scandinavia, which is scheduled to launch in August 2021.

Fashion Magazines

The fashion media landscape is currently characterized by a few, large print publications, including Costume and ELLE. You can also find a selection of online magazines offering daily fashion news. Find these and more in our curated lists.

Home Interior Magazines

You can find several home interior magazines with significant reach and readership. Browse our overview to find magazines focusing on designing your home, cabin, garden, and more.

Meet some of the editors

Kine B. Hartz

Kine B. Hartz is a leading figure in the Norwegian fashion media landscape. As the Editor-in-Chief of the country’s biggest fashion magazine, Costume, she has a solid impact on the industry.

 

Rawdah Mohamed

Rawdah Mohamed is an established influencer and model, and is from fall 2021 set to be Vogue Scandinavia’s Norwegian Fashion Editor. She is regarded as one of the Norwegian fashion industry’s most powerful profiles, and has captured the attention from a worldwide audience.

 

Cecilie Jørgensen

Cecilie Jørgensen is the Editor-in-Chief of the Norwegian home interior magazine BO BEDRE.

 

Kriss Daatland

Kriss Daatland is the Editor-in-Chief of Bonytt, Norway’s biggest home interior magazine.

 

 

To get access to the Norwegian curated lists of these Magazines, Influencers, Stylists, Editors-in-chief, Editors, and more

   

Sara is the Norwegian Market Coordinator at VOCAST, responsible for Norwegian fashion and lifestyle research. When not at VOCAST, she studies Brand and Communications at Copenhagen Business School. Besides work and studies, she is a travel, music and movie enthusiast.

 

 

 

 

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Get free knowledge on how to optimize your B2B marketing & new product releases.

RELATED POSTS

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: The country of chocolate, fries, and … fashion. Maybe not as tasty, but surely more than tasteful. Martin Margiela, Dries Van Noten, Raf Simons, and Ann Demeulemeester are just a few of the big names who rose to fame from the country’s main cities Antwerp and...

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Dutch Design is the national pride of The Netherlands and the subject of international praise. It is the umbrella term for the country’s design æsthetics and its popularity explains why VOCAST offers insights into the versatile market with a wide array of (niche)...

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

Norway is one of the selected markets coordinated by VOCAST. On our platform, you can find curated lists within fashion, home interior, and lifestyle to help you conquer the Norwegian market. Here are which tendencies and traditions currently shape the consumption...

Sweden: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Sweden: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Sweden: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Why is the land of lagom, Abba, Acne Studios, and Ikea interesting for your brand? And how do you conquer the lifestyle market? Even though Sweden is a small country, it is known for its strong business climate, global competitiveness, and commitment to innovation. The country is also ranked as the fourth most competitive economy in Europe (1). With great traditions in craftsmanship, and connection to nature the Swedes are spoiled with durable materials, quality design and have high expectations of brands and products. So, you can definitely say Sweden is a rich design and fashion nation!

At the same time, Sweden has a great fascination for what’s happening internationally. It is a very well-traveled and educated nation that frequently brings influences and lifestyles from around the globe into their everyday lives. But, there are a few important things to know about the market. Here is why and how you should go about conquering the Swedish Lifestyle Market:

Sustainability is a given not a trend

Since Sweden is a nation that is privileged enough to be at the forefront of sustainability, this is an important value amongst consumers since they are raised close to nature and learn to cherish the environment from their early years. Therefore, sustainability is not a trend but a given way of living – a fact that brands need to keep in mind when entering the market. 

Several brands, both within the fashion and interior sector have implemented circular business models like rental services, re-using old collections, or promoting second-hand ownership. This is something the Swedish lifestyle audience welcomes with open arms and goes in line with the overarching values in the lifestyle market like sustainability, quality, and tech innovation.

Digitally Savvy

With a tech-savvy population, a lot of doors open up for international brands to capture consumers’ attention and interest, reaching the Swedish audience online before entering the market physically. Social Media has a huge influence on Swedish consumers where influencers, both international and Swedish ones, set trends. 89% of the population are active on SoMe and despite Facebook having the biggest market share, Instagram is the most popular platform when interacting with brands (1).

(1) Sources: Statistics from Statista, 2020, and the Nordic Council of Ministers 2021

Humble Hierarchy

The lifestyle industry in Sweden is somewhat small which means that most professionals know each other, so one contact can lead to another. A trick to get started is to find common ground since Swedes need some time to get warmed up to people – even editors and content contributors. The work environment in the lifestyle sector is casual with a flat hierarchical structure where titles aren’t as important as in other European markets – like Germany or France for example. Reaching out to an assistant is a good move to start with since the Editor-in-Chief usually will look for a point of reference from their team (but no one will be offended or find you rude if you reach out directly to an EIC!) 

Get acquainted with the Swedish media landscape

Fashion Media Landscape

Home Interior Media Landscape 

A prominent influencer scene

On this small graphic, we have identified 360+ macro-influencers, up-and-coming influencers, and niche influencers on our Swedish curated lists. The biggest following on social media is around 2M, with an average of 60-150K followers. Even though the numbers are smaller than on other markets, their influence is great among their audience and within the industry.  Whether known on Instagram, Youtube, or TikTok, Swedish influencers are present on various social media platforms with the ability to reach a variety of audiences. This makes influencer marketing essential for brands wanting to gain traction within the Swedish market. 

Hanna Stefansson

One of the most loved influencers in Scandinavia, Hanna Stefansson, is Swedish raised but Copenhagen based. She is a professional when it comes to cool outfits, dreamy locations and yummy breakfasts.

Linn Eklund

Stockholm-based fashionista with an international and eclectic style. Linn Eklund is the co-founder of the cyber mag Hobnob Journal that inspires fashion-lovers to hang their investments in their closets.

 

Kristin Rödin

Kristin Rödin is the face behind the minimalistic interior account @homebykristinrodin. This tasteful interior profile have also a solid 500k followers on her lifestyle account.

 

Sofia Wood

With three cook books on her resume, Sofia Wood is also a podcast host and adored blogger within interior. Original craftsmanship, conscious design, and inviting table settings are Wood’s signum.

 

Print and Online Publications

Stockholm is the self-proclaimed capital of Scandinavia and here you find the majority of the big publishing houses like Bonnier, Aller Media, Plaza Publishing, and Story House Egmont. The publishing industry is up to speed with digitalization, but still, values building personal relationships through networking at events and showroom lunches. 

Have a look at some of the Swedish fashion and interior magazines below. 

Fashion Magazines

ELLE, Damernas värld, and STYLEBY are all commercial magazines with an online presence that are published monthly. Vogue Scandinavia, with its HQ in Stockholm, is planned to launch in August 2021.

Home Interior Magazines

Sweden has a wide range of titles from commercial magazines like Sköna hem, Residence, and Nya Rum to smaller niche magazines focusing on outdoor exterior or retro design. Find the magazines on our curated lists alongside many others.

Other Magazines

The more edgy publications are produced on a much smaller scale but with just as much impact! They also do a great job fusing fashion and interior together with technology and innovation.

Meet some of the editors

Jonna Bergh

As the Editor-in-Chief for both Damernas Värld and STYLEBY Magazine, Jonna Bergh is a key player when it comes to Swedish fashion publications.

 

Columbine Smille

Columbine Smille is the Fashion Director at STYLEBY Magazine, freelance creative consultant and member of the Advisory Board at Swedish Fashion Council.

 

Cia Jansson

As Editor-in-Chief at ELLE Decoration and ELLE Cia Jansson is equally important within the home interior and fashion industry. There aren’t many editors with her experience within lifestyle publishing.

 

Jesper Tilberg

Jesper Tillberg is the Editor-in-Chief at PLAZA Interiör, one of the most popular interior magazines in Sweden. Currently, he is also the temporary EIC at PLAZA Magazine, a well-known lifestyle magazine.

 

 

To get access to the Swedish curated lists of these Magazines, Influencers, Architects, Editors-in-chiefs, Editors, and more

   

 

Josefine is the Swedish Market Coordinator, responsible for the fashion and lifestyle research and coordination within the Swedish market. Alongside her work, at VOCAST she is finishing her studies in Communication Design & Media in Copenhagen.

 

 

 

 

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Get free knowledge on how to optimize your B2B marketing & new product releases.

RELATED POSTS

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: The country of chocolate, fries, and … fashion. Maybe not as tasty, but surely more than tasteful. Martin Margiela, Dries Van Noten, Raf Simons, and Ann Demeulemeester are just a few of the big names who rose to fame from the country’s main cities Antwerp and...

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Dutch Design is the national pride of The Netherlands and the subject of international praise. It is the umbrella term for the country’s design æsthetics and its popularity explains why VOCAST offers insights into the versatile market with a wide array of (niche)...

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

Norway is one of the selected markets coordinated by VOCAST. On our platform, you can find curated lists within fashion, home interior, and lifestyle to help you conquer the Norwegian market. Here are which tendencies and traditions currently shape the consumption...

Denmark: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Denmark: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Denmark: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

VOCAST has been curating lists for the Danish Fashion and Home Interior sectors for many years. Due to the relevance of conquering the Danish Market for all lifestyle brands. Danes value design, quality, transparency – and the storytelling of a brand. With a strong national identity and pride in Danish Design – the Danes love to support the brands that differentiate on both design and histories. 

Find a recap of important things to know about the market. Here is why and how you should go about conquering the Danish Lifestyle Market:

Quality over quantity

Danes are born and raised surrounded by nothing but quality. The Danish design heritage and excellent quality are, for that reason, very important. Offer a Dane vintage and long-lasting styles, with a modern and casual twist – and you will have their heart. The quality of lifestyle is important to the Danes too, and Denmark takes great pride in their welfare state. Doing business in the Danish Market is built on trust, actually, everything the Danes do is built on trust – trust is a key value in the Danish culture. Honesty and a strong relation with your collaborating partners is expected in Denmark.

Keep it cool and casual

Danes are in general highly educated and well informed. But, there is no need to be formal when approaching a Dane, they are known for their informality. Humor is the key to get the attention of Danes – don’t forget they have been awarded the title of the happiest country in the world multiple times. At the same time, Danes love efficiency so keep the casual approach, but don’t get slobby – Danes have deadlines, and they will follow them!

The pride of Danishness

Danishness” – a core value for Danish people. The Danes take great pride in being Danish and the ideology of Danishness – they tend to almost worship the culture and their design. It might be due to the fact that Denmark is such a small country, that the national identity has to be at its highest. ‘Danish Design’ is a value stamp for Danes, and many feel supportive of their fellow Danes. So when it comes to the Danish market, bear in mind that everything you do has to align with the Danish culture and value-set. The Danes may commute by bike and value practicality in their homes and outfits, but that does not mean they will ever downgrade on design nor on quality.

 

Get acquainted with the Danish media landscape

Included in VOCAST’s Danish curated lists

 

A rich influencer scene

The Danish influencer scene is aesthetically pleasing to the eye, with respect for the Danish values of quality and design. Denmark is the most daring country in Scandinavia in regard to color and pattern mixing. This is clearly shown when browsing through the landscape of Danish lifestyle influencers. The fact that Denmark is quite a small country can be an advantage for up & coming influencers since it is possible to quickly move up the ladder and achieve a quite big following. With that said, the Danish Influencer market is constantly evolving, with new profiles arising weekly. You can always find a Danish influencer matching your brand values and aesthetics.

Pernille Teisbæk

Pernille is one of Denmarks Fashion Influencers with the highest following on Instagram. Pernille Teisbæk has 1M followers and is working as a Stylist and Creative Director.

Cathrine de Lichtenberg

Cathrine is a Danish Home Interior Influencer with 71,3K followers on Instagram, surrounded by a rainbow of colors wherever she goes.

Emili Sindlev

Emili is a Danish Fashion Influencer with around 600K followers on Instagram, living the Copenhagen life. You will always see her incorporate a hint of neon in her urban-street-chic outfits.

Michael Schmidt

Michael is a Danish Interior Influencer, with a following of 26K on Instagram. His profile is showcasing the essence of Danish design, with high-quality minimalism and a splash of color.

 
 

 

Ella Karberg

Ella is a Danish Fashion Influencer with a following of 194K on Instagram, representing the younger part of the Fashion industry with a playful and colorful style.

 
 

 

 

Key publishing houses

Denmark has a long-standing design history affecting the publishing landscape, consisting of multiple magazines addressing various spectrums of Danish design and fashion.

As Denmark is a small country, with a small media landscape – you will find a few key publishing houses holding the most important lifestyle magazines:

Aller Media

Aller Media is the leading publisher of magazines and weeklies in Denmark, holding publications such as ELLE, Femina, IN, Mad & Bolig og Dossier.

Story House Egmont

Egmont is one of the leading Nordic media companies, holding publications such as Eurowoman, Euroman, ALT for Damerne, BoligLiv & RUM.

Bonnier Publications

Bonnier Publications is holding a wide portfolio of inspiring publications, including Bo Bedre, Bolig Magasinet, COSTUME, COSTUME Living, iForm, Liv, Woman, and more.

 

Meet some of the editors

Cecilie Ingdal

Cecilie Ingdal is the Editor-in-Chief at ELLE Denmark and has been since the publication of the magazine. 

 

Anne Lose

Anne Lose is the Editor-in-Chief at Eurowoman Denmark & RUM Interior Design. 

 

Barbara Gullstein

Barbara W. Gullstein is the Senior Fashion Director at Eurowoman & Euroman Denmark. 

 

Sophia Roe

Sophia Roe is the newly announced Danish Fashion Editor at Vogue Scandinavia. 

 

 

To get access to the Danish curated lists of these Magazines, Influencers, Stylists, Editors-in-chief, Editors, and more

   

Image: Copenhagen Fashion Week Image Bank.

Sarah is the Lifestyle Researcher for the Danish market at VOCAST. She is very passionate about the fashion industry and along with her work at VOCAST she studies Communication at Copenhagen Business School.

 

 

 

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Get free knowledge on how to optimize your B2B marketing & new product releases.

RELATED POSTS

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: The country of chocolate, fries, and … fashion. Maybe not as tasty, but surely more than tasteful. Martin Margiela, Dries Van Noten, Raf Simons, and Ann Demeulemeester are just a few of the big names who rose to fame from the country’s main cities Antwerp and...

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Dutch Design is the national pride of The Netherlands and the subject of international praise. It is the umbrella term for the country’s design æsthetics and its popularity explains why VOCAST offers insights into the versatile market with a wide array of (niche)...

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

Norway is one of the selected markets coordinated by VOCAST. On our platform, you can find curated lists within fashion, home interior, and lifestyle to help you conquer the Norwegian market. Here are which tendencies and traditions currently shape the consumption...

The UK: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

The UK: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

The UK: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

VOCAST has been curating lists for the UK Fashion and Home Interior sectors for some time now, and now we want to share with you the true potential of the British lifestyle scene and how you can unlock this vast market.

Brits are known for their varying array of accents, priding themselves on having good manners, and complaining about the bad British weather. They really love tradition, but when it comes to fashion and interior it’s more fun with a twist. This is one of the reasons why the “Scandi Chic” trend has boomed in the UK recently – Scandinavian lifestyle brands know exactly how to balance familiar and minimal, yet bold and daring design, which Brits love!

Find a recap of important things to know about the market. Here is why and how you should go about conquering the UK Lifestyle Market:

Tradition is in our DNA

The UK’s full name is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and it’s made up of four different nations: England, Scotland, Wales, and NI. We all refer to ourselves as Brits – but also as English, Scottish, Welsh, or Northern Irish depending on which nation we come from and there is an important difference between the four. For example, even though they’re both British, you should never call a Scott English!

Brits are by nature very traditional – we do things a certain way and it can take a minute for us to get our heads around changing those ways if we’re comfortable with them. Brits are aware of their access to a big international market due to the nature of English as a language. It’s a blessing and curse that our native language is the most widely spoken in the world because it means that, despite the large markets we opperate in, we’re not used to adapting culturally. On one hand, we have some of the biggest lifestyle publishers in the industry who are genuinely able to reach across the whole globe without translating their work. However, it can make us appear closed-minded and often unaware of how traditional our values are because we have little ability to access the international lifestyle industry unless it’s been translated.

There’s power in diversity

London is most defiantly the fashion capital of the UK, and you will often hear Londoners’ pride in the diversity and international makeup of the city. Though there is arguably a very classic and traditional British style (think Burberry and Vogue pre-Edward Enninful…) one of the most exciting things about the British lifestyle industry is its internationality and multiculturalism. There are designers and journalists from all over the world who come to the UK, especially to London, to study in English-speaking universities and now these people play major roles in the UK’s lifestyle industry. Brits love international fashion and interior design – a lot! Brits will joke about having Italian shoes, German kitchens, French beauty products, and Scandinavian dining chairs that they’ve gone and bought in American-style malls. We are an island out on our own, somewhere culturally between Europe and the US. We love to merge internationally diverse designs into our lives to be more like our “neighbors”.

“Manners Maketh Man”

The lifestyle industry in the UK is vast and it ranges between various styles and budgets. But, what matters to Brits when engaging with design and lifestyle is experiences, impressions, and personality. When we shop, we’re preconditioned to notice and remember how polite and funny the brands’ employees were – which is just as important to some Brits as the design of the products themselves. The same goes for media and journalism. We want to buy things that are being promoted by models and influencers who we think “are actually probably really nice in real life” than from an ad that feels like a brand is talking at us with no personality. Hence, good manners and a quick sense of humor are really important traits that the UK press looks for in people they work with, from brands to influencers.

 

Get acquainted with the UK’s media landscape

Included in VOCAST’s UK curated lists

 

Media moguls

Due to the nature of the English language, working with the British press and UK native influencers will not only give your brand access to a British audience but a global one. 

Alicia Roddy is one of the Uk’s biggest Fashion Influencers with over 1 Million followers on Instagram, followed by Hannah Desai, Lydia Millen, and Victoria Magrath, all of whom can be found in our Top 10 Fashion Advocates list, with consent, ready to be contacted. These prominent, globally known influencers only make up four of the many relevant influencers. With brands working with different aesthetics, brand values, and products, there are countless micro as well as macro-influencers.

Alicia Roddy

Alicia Roddy is one of the UK’s most prominent fashion influencers sharing fashion, beauty, and travel-related content on her social media channels. 

Hannah Desai

Hannah is a London-based fashion blogger, with her large following and respected presence, she is one of the most important British fashion influencers.

Lydia Millen

Lydia Millen is the author of a fashion and lifestyle blog and in 2016 she went blog to vlog, launching her Youtube channel with videos focusing on high fashion, beauty, travel, and day-to-day life.

Victoria Magrath

An expert fashion and beauty ambassadorship with a global audience, Victoria is the lady behind the award-winning fashion, travel, and beauty blog Inthefrow.

 

Print and Online Publications

As the design capital of the UK, London the home of all the major publishing houses and magazine HQs’ in the UK. Discover a few of the many publications you have access to through the UK Curated Lists below!

British Vogue

Vouge really is the most famous British fashion publication. You can find other Condé Nast magazines with consent to contact such as House & Garden, LOVE, GQ, and Glamour in the UK curated lists.

Wallpaper*

Wallpaper* is a design and style magazine that pushes creative territories and covers everything from architecture to motoring, fashion to travel, interiors to jewelry.

i-D

i-D is dedicated to fashion, music, art, and youth culture, founded by designer and former Vogue art director Terry Jones in 1980.

 

Meet some of the editors

Sarah Harris

Sarah Harris is the deputy editor and fashion features director at British Vogue. She reports on current affairs, women’s interests, and fashion.

 

Dylan Jones

Dylan Jones OBE is the Editor-in-Chief of British GQ, GQ Style, and GQ.com. He is also a Chairman of London Fashion Week Men’s, as well as a Hay Festival Trustee. 

 

Donna Wallace

Donna Wallace is the fashion and accessories editor at British Vogue and was previously accessories editor at Elle UK.

 

 

To get access to the UK curated lists of these Magazines, Influencers, Architects, Editors-in-chief, Editors, and more:

   

Georgina is the UK Market Coordinator at VOCAST, responsible for British fashion and lifestyle research. Along with her work at VOCAST and studies at Copenhagen Business School, she is passionate about conscious fashion reform in the industry. 

 

 

 

 

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Get free knowledge on how to optimize your B2B marketing & new product releases.

RELATED POSTS

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Belgium: The country of chocolate, fries, and … fashion. Maybe not as tasty, but surely more than tasteful. Martin Margiela, Dries Van Noten, Raf Simons, and Ann Demeulemeester are just a few of the big names who rose to fame from the country’s main cities Antwerp and...

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

The Netherlands: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Dutch Design is the national pride of The Netherlands and the subject of international praise. It is the umbrella term for the country’s design æsthetics and its popularity explains why VOCAST offers insights into the versatile market with a wide array of (niche)...

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

The Norwegian lifestyle market – get acquainted

Norway is one of the selected markets coordinated by VOCAST. On our platform, you can find curated lists within fashion, home interior, and lifestyle to help you conquer the Norwegian market. Here are which tendencies and traditions currently shape the consumption...