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The Power of Podcasting

The Power of Podcasting

The Power of Podcasting

Podcasts are not a new format in 2020. Nevertheless, it is a marketing element with many, and still untapped, possibilities. VOCAST has created a Podcast list for Fashion and Home/Interior, for each market to help our brands navigate in the podcasting sphere. 

 

 

The podcast market is predicted to break the $1 billion revenue threshold in 2021 based on current trends and growth and despite the economic crisis (Improve Podcasts, 2020). The medium is highly popular, to say the least, and is known for its loyal and engaged listeners. With increasingly saturated and crowded social media channels, finding innovative ways to reach your target is undoubtedly becoming difficult.

By knowing more about the medium and how to navigate with it, brands will have the opportunity to benefit from sponsoring or partnering up with a podcast, which will help boost brand awareness and to reach beyond the existing customer base. So why not consider podcasting as a tool for your next marketing strategy?

Research shows that people who listen to podcasts are more focused on the content as they have actively chosen to listen to the specific episode (Acast & Nielsen, 2018). Unlike the endless scroll where the viewer filters out most of the visual content, for advertisers, an attractive factor of podcasting is the niche segments represented in the audible space, which is characterized by loyal trades and high recommendation power to their peers. Consequently, the podcast audience has its own features and particularities.

The possibility for independent podcast producers or brands to compete with large-scale institutional podcast productions is comparable to the function of YouTube, blogging, and other social media, where the democratization of distribution and availability may enable these to successfully reach a mass audience. Considering that people are big fans of on-demand services, podcasts are flourishing and can additionally serve a popular ‘binge experience’.

 

 

Key features of the podcast audience

The growth of the podcast media represents an important opportunity for digital marketing audiences to have a high trust for podcasts and their hosts, and brands are slowly starting to invest larger sums into podcast advertising.

Podcast consumption is increasing globally by a few percent each year. In the U.K alone, the weekly podcast listeners have nearly doubled in the past five years an estimated 42 million Americans (14%) are weekly podcast listeners (Acast & Nielsen, 2018). In Denmark, 18% of the population listens to podcasts on a weekly basis, with 31% of these being 15- to 31-year-olds (DR, 2018).

This is why podcasts are starting to establish themselves in mainstream markets, representing important marketing opportunities for lifestyle brands (WGSN, 2017).

🇩🇰 1.3 million weekly listeners

🇩🇪 10.4 million weekly listeners

🇫🇷 4 million monthly listeners

🇮🇹 7 million monthly listeners

🇬🇧 5.9 million weekly listeners

🇺🇸 104 million monthly listeners

🇳🇴 1.4 million weekly listeners

🇸🇪 1.6 million weekly listeners

🇳🇱 5.5 million monthly listeners

🇧🇪 2.2 million monthly listeners

(Audience report, 2019)

Typically, the podcast listener is a consumer with a higher education choosing podcasts specifically as a media in order to relax. In many ways, podcasts are a great media for those who seek other types of content to consume other than visual ones. The loyal podcast listener in the UK spends more than 3.6 hours a week listening to podcasts.

Moreover, the majority of these state that they have recommended either a podcast or a product they have heard about in a podcast. This is an indicator that podcasts have a way higher engagement rate compared to other digital media, as audio becomes a different platform, just like video before it, for brands to speak directly to their most engaged consumers while offering authentic content which could be compared to exclusive “behind-the-scenes” insights of the brands.

“A modern company is of course also using podcasts as an active part of its branding strategy.

(BoF, 2019) Podcast listeners are also highly active on social media. As many as 93% of all podcast listeners are actually active social media users. Moreover,  52% listen to podcasts while driving, and 46% while traveling.

Podcasting & the Lifestyle industry

Although luxury lifestyle brands are seldom synonymous with digital innovation, brands have started to experiment with the media over the past years. Admittedly, podcasts are not the widest reach tactic and are by definition not visual. Nevertheless, brands such as Hermes, Margiela, Chanel, Miu Miu and Chloé all now have their own in-house podcast, as they represent opportunities for various marketing scopes to engage listeners in their digital universe through storytelling.

 “The new beauty floor at Saks has everything you might expect from a high-end emporium working to prove itself in the digital age: a custom foundation bar, a facial workout gym and, as of last week, a podcast in residence” (BoF, 2019)

 
Brand narrative

In addition to this, it can be a great contrast and contribution to the increasingly “visual” digital marketing strategies. Through podcasts, brands are enabled to tell the in-depth stories they are unable to tell through an Instagram post. The deeper communication messages, such as editorial works, have inevitably been neglected in the digital era and in this way, podcasting is also a great tool to control the brand narrative.

Podcasts should be used in order to address brand awareness and deepen the relationship with the existing target audience. More importantly, branded podcasts allow brands to strengthen their credibility within their actual market by reaching a target who is already engaged with the brand.

Niche tool

Branded podcasts are a great tool, but they won’t be your broadest reach tool. It is a great way to engage with your existing audience and deepen your relationship. The social nature of the podcast listener makes them even more inclined to be great mediators of word-of-mouth. 3/5 podcast listeners claim to have recommended a podcast or to have recommended a product heard of from a podcast (Acast, 2018).

Narrator

The podcast host holds a key power as the narrator. It is key that this is an acknowledged and trusted person, who the audience can relate to. As a brand, make sure to put your key persona behind the microphone for the most engaged and organic result. Moreover, podcasts offer a way to communicate with local audiences in their language- literally.

While a branded podcast may seem like a larger investment for some, fear not, there are other ways to approach the media: podvertising.

Keep up with the podcast lingo

Although podcasts aren’t new under the sun, it can be difficult to keep track of the terminology. VOCAST has summarized the key terms necessary for understanding the media and its context:

Podvertising: Podcast advertising

Podcast directories: Apps or online platforms where podcasts are listed and available to be listened to

Podcasting platforms: Digital platforms where podcasts are produced or uploaded or both

Spoken banner: A kind of podcast advertising where a message from the advertiser is read out loud.

Read-in advertising: Unlike the spoken banner, this is a kind of podcast advertising where the ad is integrated as content communicated directly by the podcast host.

Branded podcast: A podcast produced by a brand with the aim to engage listeners in their universe through storytelling

Podvertising

Partnering up with an already existing podcast is like partnering up with another brand. There are clear values, the host’s image, and the audience’s expectations to consider. This has to be done strategically when selecting a program and moving forward with the sponsorship process.

A podvertising sponsorship can take many forms but the most common one is a direct response ad, with a specific promotion that easily can be tracked through the point of sale. A direct-response ad can thereafter be evaluated to make sure that the brand gets their wanted ROI.

Usually, a podcast is measured in downloads and a download can’t assure a listen, which can become an issue in the long run. But. Podcasts have other perks that don’t translate into statistics right away but will have positive, long-term effects on building your brand’s image and creating awareness, which is essential in 2020.

Benefits of podvertising

  • Mobility: Listeners can bring a podcast anywhere which makes it part of their daily routine 
  • Engagement: the most loyal audience of all mediums are podcast-listeners, they become addicted to“their” show 
  • Multi-platform Exposure: Most Podcasts have multiple channels where they communicate and the podvertising will have widespread on socials, newsletters, websites, etc. 
  • Selectivity: A podcast is carefully selected through a conscious choice by the listener 
  • Buying Power: The podcast audience is typically in the higher income brackets and is in a close relationship with the host – that have influential recommendation power 
  • Long-lasting Endorsement: The nature of podcasts allows the advertisement to stay on the episode permanently. Which means that the podvertisment can be downloaded in 2 years and still have an impact 
  • Spacious: Visual mediums are crammed these days and everyone is there. But there is still room to fill in the audible space

A word of advice:

When adjusting the tone of your brand’s podvertisment consider the listeners context. A survey constructed by Spotify in 2020 showed that forty-five percent of listeners state that they wished brands could better speak to what they’re doing when they hear ads.

 

The podcast host: Voice of influence and authority

Usually, the podcast host is an official persona who works hard and gradually gain his or her follower base. The relationship between a listener and the podcast host is often perceived as intimate as the audience relates directly to the authority. Listeners form relationships with the host as they often feel that they are being spoken to directly.

The host gains a position of high trust, influencing his or her listeners which is why utilizing the host-voiced advertising, is so efficient.

We interviewed the french interior podcast host Elise Hoppe, from the Brocanist, and the Swedish fashion blogger icon, influencer and podcast co-host of Säker Stil: Ebba von Sydow, to investigate the relationship between podcaster and brand.

 

Q: How do you work with sponsorships and advertisements in your podcast?


Currently, I haven’t any sponsor nor any advertising on my podcast The Brocantist, because I haven’t found the right partner. As I don’t earn any money with my podcast, I always keep in mind that I do the podcast because I like it, and I always try to ask myself:  do I still love it? yes? then I continue. Is it relevant to my community? yes, then I continue.

If the right partner happens to knock on my door one day, we will certainly have a discussion about my positioning, my tone of voice, and the values I believe in. And even if there is no obligation for me at the moment to have a sponsor, I have my secret wishlist ready.

Q: Which factors do you consider when entering a collaboration?


Transparency, transparency, transparency. If we work together, I need to trust you and you need to trust me. It’s a win-win. Regarding the topics, I would be happy to promote: any brand in circular economy or sharing economy.

Any innovation that would help to move to a more sustainable and more ethical world. Any partner, willing to move forward really.

Q: How do you see your position as a podcast host to communicate another brand’s message? What are your motivations for doing that?

I used to work in Advertising and I know the target group is the key. So, as long as my community can use the information given by the brand, I am happy. NB: The Brocantist is a podcast that promotes sustainable initiatives in the home interior sector.

Q: Which kind of sponsorships do you usually do/would you like to do?

I would consider doing a promotional code for a product or a service with general information about a brand with a call to action like voting, donating, etc. Other than that, I am open to discuss.

Q: How do you work with sponsorships and advertisements in your podcast?

We believe in serving our followers and listeners with free content, which is why we choose to work with partnerships and sponsorships representing more long-term collaborations that mirrors the entire platform of Säker Stil. Which consists of our Instagram account, our channels on Facebook, our newsletter Weekly and obviously our personal accounts, Ebba von Sydow and Emilia de Poret.

Q: Which factors do you consider when entering a collaboration?

Actually only one thing: That the collaboration needs to be enlightening, fun and inspiring for our followers, listeners and friends of Säker Stil out there. That’s the most important, always.

This is simply crucial, given that it has to work for our followers while satisfying our collaborating partner, especially since we love working with brands where we get to learn something new, get inspired and transmit messages of really great products, brands and services.

Q: How do you see your position as a podcast host to communicate another brand’s message? What are your motivations in doing that?

What motivates us daily is that we have so much fun with Säker Stil. Love what you do! Foremost we’re focusing on creating inspiring, fun and lovely content – that’s always first.

After that it’s absolutely amazing to run a business around this, with a great team of clever colleagues – and to use the platform to lift up other people and brands who do great things that we really enjoy, that’s a bonus! 

Q: Which kind of sponsorships do you usually do?

We are so proud over the partnerships we work with. A red-thread is that they are brave, dares to try the new, digitally aware, goes for it creatively and trusts us. That, we are deeply thankful for!

 

Feeling inspired?

VOCAST has gathered the key contacts from the most relevant lifestyle podcasts in each market, in the curated lists. Below you will find an extract of fashion and interior podcasts that might fit your brand. Reach out!

🇫🇷 Chiffon

Chiffon is a Podcast created and hosted by Valérie Tribes who is also working as a freelance fashion journalist. Chiffon analyzes our relationship with fashion and clothing from a sociological point of view and Valérie interviews women and men from different backgrounds to discuss various fashion topics.

Listen to podcast

🇩🇪 SOFA SO GOOD

Sofa so good is a podcast hosted by Editor in Chief of Schöner Wohnen Magazine Bettina Billerbeck and columnist Anne Zube. The home interior experts tackle every day interior questions within their discussions, filled with tips, tricks and humour.

Listen to podcast

🇬🇧 Fashion Fix with Charli Howard

Charli Howard is an English model and body positive activist. She is regularly featured in British Vogue and founded her own beauty brand. Charli is undoubtedly one of the most prominent faces of the future of British fashion. Her podcast, which she hosts for the BBC: Fashion Fix with Charli Howard is a space where she and her guests discuss everything from sustainable fashion, modest fashion, streetwear and thrifting, and of course body positivity.

Listen to podcast

🇸🇪 Inredningspodden

Every week Johanna Hulander interviews interesting people within the field of design, interior and architecture in Scandinavia. She have had thoughtful and intelligent conversations with Knud Erik Hansen, CEO of Fritz Hansen, Thommy BIndefelt Creative Director at Svenskt Tenn and visual artist Åsa Jungnelius among others.

Listen to podcast

🇩🇰 BEDRE MODE

Bedre Mode is the first Danish blog to focus 100% on sustainable fashion. The podcast is hosted by Johanne Rytter Stenstrup. Through interviews with Denmarks leading Wardrobe- and Fashion Researcher, Johanne is researching how a new clothing culture could lead to a more sustainable wardrobe and clothing industry.

Listen to podcast

🇳🇴 Interiørpraten by Bonytt

What happens when you have a designer and an editor in chief visit some of the most interesting homes in Norway? The answer is a lot of unexpected conversations highlighting their interior and living decisions. A true podcast gem for anyone wanting to be inspired for their own home or simply get a front row listen into Norways most thoughtful homes.

Listen to podcast

🇳🇱 Sneakerjagers

Sneakerjagers is a Dutch platform and platform with all the sneaker news you can wish for – a true advocate of the Dutch streetwear movement.

Listen to podcast

   
   

Josefine is the Swedish Design & Fashion Researcher at VOCAST. When not working Josefine can be found studying communication at KEA, dancing to Abba music, or searching for Copenhagen’s finest vintage denim.

 

   

Olivia is the Italian Market Coordinator at VOCAST. She studied Fashion Marketing & Communication at IED in Milan, where she also began working with fashion marketing and PR. When not at VOCAST, she can be found in her kitchen developing recipes, dealing with the transition from pizza to rye bread.

 

 

 

 

   
   

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Italy: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

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Italy: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Italy: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Italy: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

VOCAST is launching Italian curated lists for the lifestyle market. With over 67.000 fashion brands (1) and over 30.000 interior design companies (2), not to mention world prestigious wool, silk, lace and leather manufacturers, Italy represents one of the largest lifestyle markets in the world. The country’s ancient artisanal traditions have drilled Italians to dress and decorate homes properly for centuries.

As Italians put quality and beauty at the center of any product, they are highly educated consumers who seek a sophisticated product with a long-lasting lifecycle. It is therefore not a coincidence that Scandinavian design has been trending increasingly in Italian fashion magazines and among consumers the past years. Inevitably, there are still a few things to know about the market. Here is why and how you should conquer the Italian lifestyle market:

Quality: Make sure to do your homework

Italians know quality and love a good story. Make sure that your product descriptions are complete, on-point and put effort into storytelling when it comes to the provenience and sourcing of material and design. With that in mind, forget ambiguity- Italians will call you out for it. Instead, underline the uniqueness of your product even in the smallest details. This is key to tackle the competition of the national merchandise mark, Made in Italy.

Since the 80’s,  Made in Italy has developed into a global mark of excellence regarding quality and design for products designed, produced and packed in Italy. The Italian regulations are more strict than the German and American mark and special efforts have been made for the past twenty years to protect and market Made in Italy.

 

Keep it cordial

Like in many south European countries, titles and formality play an important role in most communication, especially if you are not well-acquainted with the recipient. For this reason, keep contact with the press formal and cordial to stay on the safe side, and you will make sure that your message is well received. 

 

If they like it, Italians will want to put a ring on it

With over 67.000 fashion brands in Italy alone, the competition for the consumers’ attention is high and the love story of the Italians and their favorite brands go way back. Do not try to please everyone: When it comes to the Italian market, unique positioning and identity will have a higher return as many Italians seek to invest in brands long term. This implies putting a strong emphasis on branding and storytelling. Ultimately, you also need to nurture the customer relationship as they will want to feel just as special as you are to them. Quite the commitment, but in return, you will have one of the most loyal customers in the world.

 

Get acquainted with the media landscape

+35 Magazines
+80 Editors
+70 Influencers

included in VOCASTs Italian curated lists

 

 

A rich influencer scene

Italy was a bit late to the party when it came to digitizing the lifestyle industry. However, many brands are now up-to-date with E-Commerce, social media channels as well as with influencer marketing. Global influencer royalty Chiara Ferragni paved the way to a rich fashion and lifestyle influencer arena with thousands of active influencers, many specialized in various niches. For this reason, the influencer market is constantly changing with new profiles arising weekly, ensuring that as a brand you can find an Italian profile that suits you.

Paola Turani


 

Followers: 1.5m

Paola Turani is an Italian model and influencer based in Bergamo, northern Italy. She is one of the most noted Italian lifestyle influencers and began her career as a model. Paola creates content related to her busy travel life and fashion.

Giulia Gaudino

 

Followers: 606K

Giulia Gaudino is an Italian fashion influencer based in Milan. She creates content related to romantic fashion, accessories, shoes, and beauty, including skincare and makeup. Giulia is the ambassador for brands such as Falconeri and Estee Lauder.

Sara Puccinelli

 

Followers: 63.9K

Sara Puccinelli is a lifestyle influencer based in Milan, Italy. She engages her audience through her curated minimalistic feed about fashion and interior design, as well as her frequent and authentic stories.

 

Key publishing houses

The Italian publishing landscape is advanced and long-established with multiple magazines focusing on various parts of the fashion and design system. Note that some of the top-titles such as Elle, Vanity Fair and Grazia will be found in the Weekly magazines curated list, unlike some of their international sibling editions.

Like most large lifestyle markets, there are a few key publishing houses holding the most important, but not all, lifestyle magazines:

Condé Nast Italia

The Italian branch of the global publishing house, holds established publications such as VOGUE, L’UOMO VOGUE, Architectural Digest, Vanity Fair, and GQ.

Hearst Italia

Favored fashion and interior design magazines including Elle, Cosmopolitan, Marie Claire, Esquire, Elle Decor, Marie Claire Maison are all published by Hearst Italia.

Mondadori

Grazia, INTERNI, Casa Bella, Casa Facile, Donna Moderna are published by Mondadori Group which holds a wide range of Italian fashion interior design magazines, each with their own niche.

RCS Mediagroup

RCS Mediagroup publishes not only Italy’s largest newspaper Corriere della Sera, but also lifestyle magazines such as AMICA, Living, and the popular weekly supplement IO Donna.

 

In addition to these, there are of course other key publications such as L’OFFICIEL, LAMPOON, MUSE Magazine and Pambianco for B2B communication.

 

 

Meet the editors

Emanuela Testori

Emanuela Testori is the Editor-in-chief of Amica as of 2013. She was the Deputy Director of Marie Claire Italia from 1987, before joining Amica in 2002. You will find Emanuela in the Editor-in-chief curated list.

Carlotta Marioni

Carlotta Marioni is the Fashion Director at GRAZIA Italia. She was previously worked at TUSTYLE and has a noted profile on Instagram where she publishes fashion tips and other engaging content. You will find Carlotta in the Fashion Editors & Directors curated list.

Sara Sozzani Maino

Sara Sozzani Maino is the Deputy Director at VOGUE Italia. She is also the head of VOGUE Talents, the talent initiative scouting emerging talents and designers of womenswear, menswear, accessories, and fashion photography. Sara Maino has been working at VOGUE Italia for over 20 years and is found in the Fashion Editors & Directors curated list.

 

To get access to the Italian curated lists of these and +35 magazines, Influencers, Trade Publications, Editor-in-chiefs, Editors, Fashion Directors, Fashion advocates and more

   

Olivia is the Italian Market Coordinator at VOCAST. She studied Fashion Marketing & Communication at IED in Milan, where she also began working with fashion marketing and PR. When not at VOCAST, she can be found in her kitchen developing recipes, dealing with the transition from pizza to rye bread.

 

 

 

 

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RELATED POSTS

The Power of Podcasting

The Power of Podcasting

Podcasts are not a new format in 2020. Nevertheless, it is a marketing element with many, and still untapped, possibilities. VOCAST has created a Podcast list for Fashion and Home/Interior, for each market to help our brands navigate in the podcasting sphere.   ...

Italy: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

Italy: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

VOCAST is launching Italian curated lists for the lifestyle market. With over 67.000 fashion brands (1) and over 30.000 interior design companies (2), not to mention world prestigious wool, silk, lace and leather manufacturers, Italy represents one of the largest...

2020: The Birth of Digital Fashion Weeks

2020: The Birth of Digital Fashion Weeks

When the fashion industry looks back at 2020 in 5, 10, or 20 years, what will they think of?  Will it be the overnight decrease in sales, the closing, and opening of stores, the despair amongst traditional media, or the endless new digital possibilities? Will we think...

2020: The Birth of Digital Fashion Weeks

2020: The Birth of Digital Fashion Weeks

2020: The Birth of Digital Fashion Weeks

When the fashion industry looks back at 2020 in 5, 10, or 20 years, what will they think of?  Will it be the overnight decrease in sales, the closing, and opening of stores, the despair amongst traditional media, or the endless new digital possibilities? Will we think of floral face masks (for spring? Groundbreaking!).

Or the accessibility of shows for audiences previously doomed to view them a second or third hand? Nonetheless, in 2020, the birth of digital/hybrid fashion events became the reality and is still a phenomenon in its infancy. In this short article, we tried to make sense of it and to answer the question: could it benefit our industry in the long run?

A transformation of the ages

 

 
 
 
 
 
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Une publication partagée par Leonie Hanne (@leoniehanne) le

VOCAST contact Leonnie Hanne and boyfriend Alex Galievsky outside the Balmain show during Paris Fashion Week

When it comes to modern marketing and branding techniques, one thing is for certain: They have gotten so pro they’re hard to spot. And the fashion industry has gladly adopted many of them. Think about the use of fragrance, light, and music in stores and during events — elaborate PR-packages and personalized perfectly timed ads. Naturally, this has made consumers accustomed to interacting with brands in a more sense-rich and personal manner than ever.

Even more so during fashion month when brands were telling their unique story for what’s next. This has by key players in the industry been named as the main challenge of transferring a physical fashion week into a digital experience.

Evening the playing-field

Due to the Corona-measures put in place, the fashion industry was in 2020 forced to accelerate their digital route to brand sharing. For most this has been a challenge of the ages. But aren’t there some very real benefits in delivering your vision using modern tools such as technology?

Well, of course. At VOCAST we have for long worked for and believed in the seamless expression of brands across physical and digital spheres – because it works (and it is indeed the future). And there are some obvious benefits in hosting a fashion-show partially or fully in a digital format – pandemic or not.

Firstly, the environmental footprint thousands of people leave behind when they are traveling between fashion week destinations is hard to make up with whatever sustainable measures a brand may have taken upon themselves. Greenwashing has become something of a buzzword this year exactly for these kinds of situations, where it has been identified that some use eco-consciousness more or less performatively in order to be trendy – despite having obvious sustainability conflicts.

This perspective is key when weighing out the benefits of more digital events. Second, the economical cost of creating a physical fashion-show is often associated with big budgets and sadly leaves a lot of young brands on the outside, unable to compete. With a digital approach, everyone is a newcomer in a sense, and digital empowerment needs to be generated —whether it’s your first or 25th fashion week. This, we believe, will even out the playing field within our industry and lead to more creative solutions and diversity in brands.

 

Testimonials from our network

 

 
 
 
 
 
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VOCAST partners, Copenhagen Fashion Week and London Fashion Week both successfully completed hybrid fashion weeks by hosting smaller physical events and using our platform to efficiently organize and distribute their creative universe to everyone not able to participate in-person.

As The Guardian stated, “This version of fashion week was fashion as Ted Talks, fashion as group therapy – and fashion as entertainment”. These Corona-friendly, programmed events are examples of how the digitalization of fashion weeks is helping to expand and evolve the term “fashion week”— into something more than catwalks and non-inclusive parties.

Impressive number of files downloaded In the days surrounding Copenhagen Fashion Week
Source: VOCAST image bank

 

We had the pleasure of speaking to Ditte Kristensen, Co-founder and Creative Director of Oslo Runway. They went almost 100% digital this year in light of the Coronavirus situation.

She shared some insights on how their fashion week was completed:

“We had some brands submit videos while others streamed in-depth interviews or had intimate physical activities. Everything was in season, something we have never done before, but that was a wish from the brands we were showcasing. It was definitely a challenge but we did see that the brands who made videos reached new target groups. Several also got international recognition from, among others, Vogue.com.”
She continues,
“We witnessed the Norwegian industry really get into digital activation this season, but also that it will demand a even higher level next season. Meeting socially is so crucial to our industry and is an aspect not to be forgotten.”

Ditte Kristensen, Oslo Runway
Photo: Pernille Sandberg

Paris Fashion Week, perhaps the most established of the European fashion weeks alongside Milan, completed a hefty 88 scheduled events. Both weeks consisted of digital and physical happenings, making them both hybrids. Some of the more traditional brands from France such as Balmain, Chanel, Louis Vuitton, and Dior decided to host in-person shows whereas arguably more modern operated brands like Balenciaga, Maison Margiela, and Givenchy presented digital, SoMe-driven showings.

We are intrigued to keep watching our favorite brands and this industry which we love so dearly – into the age of digital fashion weeks. As we get ready to leave the year 2020 behind us, we realize, this is only the end of the beginning.

Balenciaga´s digital showing this season, in the form of a music video

Last words

In an age when organizations have no choice but to urgently push digitalization forward, solutions that were built by thinking outside of the box are essential. Digitalization empowers fashion brands to embrace a new side to their creativity, merging art, and technology with consumer goods. One could call it a revolution that is likely to ensure the relevancy of fashion way into the future.

Vogue Business quoted how designers feel about digital solutions:

“It’s an essential tool for our brand to express our seasonal message on a global scale. Online streaming of a fashion show will reach tens of thousands on the day, and hundreds of thousands, if not more, throughout the season.”

This new hyper-digitalized mode of sharing fashion shows and collections screams 2020. Prompting inclusivity, pushing innovation, practicing sustainability, and of course, letting people stay safe at home. This is the new normal.

 

Rebekka is the Norwegian Market Coordinator at VOCAST. Her experience ranges from retail management to art show facilitator, with a passion for the human side of creative business. Her free time is gladly spent outdoors hiking, skiing, or teaching yoga.

 

Georgina is the Lifestyle Researcher for the US and UK Market at VOCAST, responsible for both American and British fashion and lifestyle research. Along with her work at VOCAST and studies at Copenhagen Business School, she is passionate about conscious fashion reform in the industry.

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Get free knowledge on how to optimize your B2B marketing & new product releases.

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Italy: Why and how to conquer the lifestyle market

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VOCAST is launching Italian curated lists for the lifestyle market. With over 67.000 fashion brands (1) and over 30.000 interior design companies (2), not to mention world prestigious wool, silk, lace and leather manufacturers, Italy represents one of the largest...

2020: The Birth of Digital Fashion Weeks

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Menswear: Expanding the breadth of opportunity

Menswear: Expanding the breadth of opportunity

Menswear: Expanding the breadth of opportunity

“With the rising fashion-consciousness and increasing importance of personal appearance amongst men, the demand for menswear is escalating across the globe.”  – Business Wire

Looking at sales statistics we can see immense growth within the menswear fashion industry. The market has been growing rapidly specifically within the past decade, which has also spiked the growth within male influencers. Menswear as a whole has been growing faster than womenswear for three years in a row now. 

As a whole, the market remains smaller, but with over 30% growth in sales of men’s luxury footwear alone, menswear is a force to be reckoned with! We spoke to an array of international industry experts from different markets within the European fashion industry in light of this article to find out where they see the industry going and to gather primary research from within various fields within the industry.

Why is there a rise in the menswear market?

Growing fashion self-expression and self-awareness:

Percentages are on the rise not only within sales but also within the demand. Men are taking themselves more seriously within the subject of appearance and clothing. We have seen continuous growth mainly within the past decade, which has only been enhanced through the current situation of many having to work from home and finding themselves with the freedom of wearing whatever they want to without having to think about an “appropriate work uniform”.

Menswear has been very dominated by the workwear market for a long time, but as workplaces become more casual, the breadth of opportunity of variety for men’s clothing has begun to rapidly grow.


Not only are men in the position of requiring extra clothing but they are also finding themselves in a place of being able to experiment with clothing and use it as a form of self-expression.

More brands, more styles, more choices:

Alongside casual menswear and athleisure, plaid shirts specifically, have been witnessing rapid sales on a global scale. Choices within the market have always been more limited in comparison to womenswear, making two centimetres more on jacket a revolution.” But with the changing of the times, comes the development and continuation of growth, awareness and willingness to grow from a designer and consumer perspective.

Men have started taking their appearances more seriously, giving them access to more variety within their wardrobes, which is being furthered and even encouraged by brands and designers following suit and offering more to their consumers. A combination of the times, technology and fashion awareness are amongst the causes of the rapid growth within the menswear market.

“The male consumer is very open to newness,” said Emmanuel de Bayser, co-owner of The Corner Berlin. “More and more, we’re seeing them following trends faster than before.”

 

Menswear outgrowing Womenswear

Whilst the womenswear market still dominates a larger chunk of the fashion industry, it is also women that have started contributing to the growth in menswear by purchasing and wearing clothing originally designed for their boyfriends and brothers, leading towards an expansion of the initial target customer.

Through this rise, it is expected for more and more brands, big and small to jump onto the trend and expand the breadth of collections and choices for customers. By doing so there will be a spike in competition within the market but also within the level of creativity and effort from brands as well as influencers will be incorporating into their work to capitalise on this growth in the market as much as they are able to.

 

What are the opportunities?

We spoke to Graham Addinall the Fashion Editor of Danish Magazine Dossier, British Freelance Stylist Michael Rathbone as well as German business owners and influencers Sissi Pohle and Patrick Scherzer, to find out where they see the industry going and to discover the opportunities menswear has to offer.

 

 

Graham Addinall

Fashion Editor of Dossier Magazine, Graham Addinall has 18 years of experience working at Paul Smith in the UK and teaches classes at a University in Barcelona to share his in depth knowledge alongside his work for Dossier. 

Find Graham on Instagram: @grahamaddinall

 

 

“I see the rise in menswear falling under different categories. From the “big spenders” aged 25 and under, who live at home and spend all their savings and income on designer it-pieces to wear for a few weeks to re-sell them afterwards all the way to the category of 40+ year old customers who have money to spend and value quality and looking as well as feeling great. Where women like purchasing items for their appearance, men are valuing quality and “like getting it right”.

Using clothing as a status symbol, even if as subtle as a logo is giving people a “code of saying I made it”.

For the future, I see the industry of mens fashion changing and have clothing become progressively more and more comfortable. Once you try something comfortable you can’t go back, which is something many customers have found especially now in these times of Covid-19, which has been pushing even something as classic and timeless as a suit to be adapted and made with more stretchy fabrics.”

 

 Michael Rathbone

London based freelance Stylist Michael Rathbone, who formerly worked for LEWIS MAGAZINE in the UK working on a strong focus within menswear styling also shared his observations with us. The University of central Lancashire graduate sent us a quote from the UK Capital with his thoughts on the topic.

Find Michael on Instagram: @michaelrathbone

 

“I think that menswear is really thriving right now due to the fact that gender stereotypes are becoming increasingly antiquated, and men are becoming more expressive in their choices. I think designers are more confident now to blur the lines and create new more exciting and innovative styles. 

Men are more comfortable with colour and playing around with new styles and looks which in turn is really helping the menswear industry, men care now more than ever about their appearance.

Streetwear and sneaker culture have really seen a rise in prominence over the last 5 years or so, and this has led to a boom in guys investing more in their wardrobes, from high street level to high-end designers. Menswear designers are really at the forefront of the industry at this time, with big names in menswear being appointed at large luxury fashion houses, like Kim Jones at Dior and now Fendi, his influence is unmatched right now.”

 

 Sissi Pohle & Patrick Scherzer 

Sissi Pohle and Patrick Scherzer are no strangers within the German fashion scene, especially when it comes to individual looks and sharing each others wardrobe it-pieces!

Whilst working as influencers they also started their own company “outofuseberlin”, which is a specialised vintage interior and fashion store and is closely collaborating with H&M Berlin. 

Find Sissi on Instagram: @sissipohle
Find Patrick on Instagram: @bangtobang
Find their store on Instagram: @outofuseberlin
Photo: Nika Boichuk

“The commercial fashion industry will probably always prefer a divide within Genders and keep producing separate men’s and women’s collections. Brands, who think more freely, and that are brave enough, already started adding unisex pieces into collections years ago.

When we buy a new piece, we only purchase items, that both of us are able to wear. This means, all in all, we consume less. We hope more collections will start being less gender-specific within their designs and to create a selection where everyone can be targeted.”

“At the end of the day success is measured on whether a customer likes and buys the Fashion. If the customer has the possibility to decide without having to ask “am I even allowed to buy this-is this piece even made for my gender?”

 

Reach out to our experts as well as more of the most renowned contacts within the men’s Fashion industry

In light of this undeniable rise within the men’s fashion industry, we at VOCAST have created curated lists dedicated solely to men’s fashion in order to make it easier for you to navigate the ever-growing market. The lists have been segmented to make targeting the most relevant people even easier.

From press to influencers and stylists, our team of international researchers has handpicked the most impactful menswear contacts for you to take the next step with your marketing strategy. 

 

Isabelle is the Fashion and Lifestyle Researcher for the DACH market at VOCAST. She has a degree in Fashion Promotion and works as a Social Media Manager and Copywriter alongside her work at VOCAST.

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The New (Digital) Normal

The international media market of today is more complex and challenging to navigate than ever before. Social media and the rise of the internet has made it not only possible but easy and socially acceptable for everyone with a smartphone to be their own personal brand publisher. It has drastically changed society forever. In terms of marketing, the choices are endless and less obvious for those looking to gain more customers. We see this particularly in our world within fashion and design, where traditional print outlets have largely been replaced by digital feed-creators,- and influencer agencies are the new normal.

To view this phenomenon through the lens of 2020 is even more exhilarating from our digital point of view. The fashion industry which used to rely heavily on events and gatherings as the primary way of generating clickable content (and drive sales!) has simply not been able to do that in light of the current Coronavirus situation. This means that brands of all sizes have been forced to rethink/revamp their strategies and rely profoundly on digital dialogue with their desired demographic. 

Despite most markets having had the most transformational year in memory, certain market drivers have proven to remain not only constant but hyper-relevant. Our team looked into it, and one of those steady factors are the leading fashion advocates within a market; key individuals who have gained an unparalleled level of following and credibility — allowing them to transcend the fluctuations of the current situation and even strengthen their level of influence. In our digital sphere, we are humbled by the powers possessed by these people — and you should be too.

In the slides below you can see an example from each market, hand-curated by our research team. (1-UK, 2-Germany, 3-Sweden, 4-France, 5-Italy, 6-Denmark, 7-Norway, 8-US, 9-Belgium, 10-Netherlands).

Header picture credits: Copenhagen Fashion Week’s Image Bank

UK - Camille Charriere

One of the most influential insiders in the British fashion scene. Camille started as a fashion blogger and later began working for prestigious Net-A-Porter and Matches Fashion. In more recent times she has done campaigns with brands such as Mango and Harrods while also running a podcast on the side; “Fashion No Filter”, with her friend and co-fashion-guru Monica de La Villardiere.

 

Georgina Juel, United Kingdom Market Researcher

Germany - Caro Daur

 

With millions of followers and a brand new fitness program, the 25 year Hamburger continues to take the German fashion scene by storm. She is highly requested by global brands such as Fendi and Adidas and is easily recognised as one of the biggest fashion influencers of our time.

 

Isabelle Kube, German Market Researcher

 

Sweden - Hanna MW

 

Hanna MW is a highly sought out creative consultant and stylist doing fashion projects on a global scale; styling at Rosie Assoulin’s show for NY fashion week as well as the latest campaign for Chimi Eyewear. It is safe to say she is an adored Swedish fashion soon-to-be icon. 

 

Josefine Forslund, Swedish Market Researcher

France - Jeanne Damas

 

Jeanne Damas is the original French it-girl and her aesthetics truly embodies Parisian elegance. Between her proved longevity in the fashion industry, never-boring content and her own beauty brand Rouje – there is no doubt she deserves the title fashion advocate.

 

Ines Boubazine, French Market Coordinator 

Italy - Eleonora Carisi

Through timeless taste and true universal imagery, influencer Eleonora Carisi crystallizes Italian style in all content that she creates. She collaborates with luxury brands which she integrates into her platform in the most authentic way, making her a valuable fashion advocate in one of the most important fashion markets in the world.

Olivia Mariani, Italian Market Coordinator

Denmark - Emili Sindlev


Emili is one of the most popular personalities today helping evolve and export Scandinavian style. With a background from the magazine industry and a global following – she is the perfect example of a fashion advocate in the digital age.   

Christine Nygaard, Danish Market Researcher

 

Norway - Janka Polliani

 

Janka went from niche fashion blogger to household name in just a decade through her many projects in fashion, TV and more recently her hit-podcast “Janka og Marte”. She is known for her glow – inside and out – and is currently contributing as an advisor at Copenhagen Fashion Week. A true fashion advocate in Norway and beyond.

Rebekka Vik, Norwegian Market Coordinator

 

US - Aimee Song

 

From hobby fashion blogger to Forbes 30 Under 30 and on the BoF 500 list. Aimee Song is one of the most impressive business women in the influencing game, having grown “Song of Style” into a multi million dollar fashion universe including several IG-accounts and a best-selling book.

Georgina Juel, United States Market Researcher

 

Belgium - Paulien Riemis

 

The O.G, Antwerp-based blogger and influencer Paulien Riemis has showcased her style, thoughts, and surroundings on her blog since 2009 and has proven to be a true fashion authority in her market.

 

Wided Bouchrika, Belgium Market Researcher

 

 

Netherlands - Negin Mirsalehi

 

Amsterdam born and bred – Negin is one of the most powerful dutch influencers. She is well underway to establishing her own beauty imperium with haircare brand Gisou. She was also included on Forbes’ 30 under 30 list in 2018.

 

Wided Bouchrika, Netherland Market Researcher

 

   

 

Rebekka is the Norwegian Market Coordinator at VOCAST. Her experience ranges from retail management to art show facilitator, with a passion for the human side of creative business. Her free time is gladly spent outdoors hiking, skiing or teaching yoga.

 

 

 

 

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Lockdown Update: Scandinavia, Europe and the US

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Lockdown Update: Scandinavia, Europe and the US

As the world has been experiencing lockdowns this year due to COVID-19, every country around the globe has been dealing with the situation differently.

Insider knowledge from various markets about the ins and outs of the current lockdown status is useful information to have to keep international businesses running as smoothly as possible.

What are office workflows like? Where do you have to wear a mask? 

How can you best get in touch with the press? 

Which markets are still in a strict phase of lockdown and which are coming through it?

These questions will all be answered below for markets in Scandinavia, Europe, and the US – along with a quote from a fashion journalist. The Lifestyle Team at VOCAST is made up of native researchers, with specific knowledge about what is happening across international markets.

Here is an update on the lockdown status of our 10 markets, updated as of 01.11.2020

Lifestyle industry updates

Lifestyle industry updates from 10 markets – Denmark to France, Italy to the US.

Do you want to know what office regulations are like or what the most efficient ways to get in touch with editors and journalists are right now? Are you looking to contact buyers and want to know the retail status of their market? These questions are answered for you below.

Each country has been given a code: dark grey for full-lockdown, light grey for strict rules, green for relaxed regulations

Navigate your way through these updates by clicking on the arrows or the dots: 1. Denmark 2. Sweden 3. Norway 4. France 5. Italy 6. Germany 7. The Netherlands 8. Belgium 9. The UK 10. The US

Denmark's November Update

Workflow & office regulations:

The evolution of Covid-19 in Denmark was not massively disruptive and the lifestyle industry was able to work close to their normal routines with few regulations. Now, the scenario has changed and the numbers of infected people are highly increasing. For that reason, the government has implemented further restrictions. Now all workplaces are encouraged to have their employees work from home to the best possible extent. Due to the fact that gatherings have been lowered to 10 people, the lifestyle industry might face some harder times again where it will be difficult or impossible to work at full capacity.

Retail status:

All non-essential stores, department stores, and shopping malls are open, but are now requiring the use of face masks while in store. Distance limitation is mandatory to ensure social distancing between customers and dispensers with hand sanitizer are placed at all entrances.

Sweden's November Update

Workflow & office regulations:

Business in Sweden is almost as usual but some restrictions are still put in place: offices are still encouraged to work from home and a limit of 50 people is allowed in social settings. When reaching out to Swedish contacts, grab a hold of the opportunity that editors and freelancers are on their emails and phones excited for new collaborative opportunities that can shine a light in times of uncertainty and an eventual financial crisis. 

Retail status:

Retail is rolling with mid-season sales but it is still struggling to keep numbers green, and employees are continuously furloughed. A survey that McKinsey & Company did in June 2020, shows that most consumers are cutting back on spending across all categories, except groceries. It is more obvious for in-store shopping than online. Hopefully, the commercial holidays like Black Friday and Christmas will help cure red numbers.

Norway's November Update

Workflow & office regulations:

Anyone able to work from home is doing so now in Norway. People are once again getting furloughed, but luckily businesses are more resilient and prepared than during the spring. Many offices have determined to stay working from home until the traditional flu season is over.

Retail status:

Stores are, for now, allowed to stay open and people are still shopping but in a very limited manner. The government has asked everyone to start their Christmas shopping early. Once again a strong digital presence seems to be the winning ticket.

France's November Update

With an average of 40.000 cases per day and an increased death toll, the French government has set new lockdown measures starting October 30th. Those measures are established for 4 weeks across the whole country.

Workflow & office regulations:

Working from home is mandatory whenever possible to reduce the number of people at the workplace. For those who can’t work from home, alternating days between home and the workplace must be encouraged.

As a result, receptionists in most publishing houses are no longer picking up the phone. Reaching out by email is now preferable, as most journalists are back to working from home.

Influencers are responsive. However, given the current situation in France with the drastic increase in the number of cases and recent terror attacks, we advise you to act and communicate carefully with French contacts and be extremely mindful.

Retail status:

Non-essential shops are closed down again, only essential shops such as supermarkets and pharmacies are allowed to be open. Wearing a mask is mandatory upon entry into stores. In light of the lockdown, many french people started their Christmas shopping 2-3 weeks early. Extremely long queues could be observed on the 29th of October in non-essential stores before the national lockdown.

Italy's November Update

Workflow & office regulations:

Covid-19 is back in Italy with full force. The number of cases and the death rates are increasing dramatically and the country is once again mobilized. The Italian government is imposing tough local restrictions around the country such as curfews, forcing non-essential shops to close at earlier hours. People are strongly advised to work from home and publishing houses are still closed, and editors are reachable via email. Influencers are very responsive and open to collaborations.

Retail status:

Regional restrictions may have shops and bars closing at earlier hours and masks are mandatory at all times. The delayed sales seasons have put a lot of pressure on the fashion industry and many companies are going through different degrees of the financial crisis. However, compared to this spring, some companies are starting to see some slow but positive developments on their profit and loss sheets.

Germany's November Update

Workflow & office regulations:

Workflow and office regulations are starting to change again. With the rise in Covid-19 numbers, offices are encouraged to work from home to contact to a minimum, since the new “Lockdown-Light” as it is being called, was introduced on 1. November, Journalists and Editors can still be contacted via E-mail.

Retail status:

Since May, all shops and retail stores have been open. However, hygienic requirements must be followed and rules have gotten more strict again. Access to shops must be controlled, queues avoided, face masks must be worn and a maximum number of people (customers and staff) must be specified in the area. Not more than one customer per 10 square meters is allowed within a store. Restaurants, gyms, theatres, beauty salons etc. have had to close again.

The Netherlands's November Update

Workflow & office regulations:

In The Netherlands, the advice is to work from home unless it’s absolutely impossible. In the case of an infection, the whole workplace can be shut down for 14 days. This means that some journalists are responsive and answering their emails while others are less available due to filled mailboxes. Influencers and their agencies are still very responsive.

Retail status:

All stores are open until 20:00 and social distancing measures of 1.5 meters are still required to keep safety. Events are prohibited, cafes, bars, and restaurants are closed, and it’s prohibited to sell, buy, or carry alcohol between 20:00 and 07:00.

Belgium's November Update

Belgium announced a nation-wide lockdown starting from 2. November until at least 13. December.

Workflow & office regulations:

Working from home is now absolutely mandatory. When not possible, keeping a social distance of 1.5 meters is required between colleagues. Most journalists have not stopped working from home since the first lockdown in spring, their response time may vary. However, influencers are still very quick to reply.

Retail status:

Only essential stores like supermarkets, bakeries and pharmacies are open. People can only shop in groups of 2 and for a maximum of 30 minutes. Flea markets and Christmas markets are shut down. Only market stalls offering essentials like food are allowed to open. All other retail, bars, coffee shops and restaurants are closed. In Brussels and Wallonia, people are only allowed to go shopping alone and there’s a curfew at 10 PM. Flanders has a curfew starting at midnight. In all regions the basics of wearing a mask and keeping 1.5m social distance remain mandatory.

The UK's November Update

A nationwide lockdown across England was announced at the end of October. The lockdown will last throughout November – all other UK nations (Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland) are exempt from this full lockdown but all have tight restrictions in place.

Workflow & office regulations:

England is now back in lockdown. This means that everyone in the country, apart from key workers, must work from home again. The new lockdown will continue until the end of November but may be extended.

Although most offices and other workplaces opened over the summer, many workplaces continued to work from home and with the new lockdown in England, this will of course continue. It is therefore most efficient to contact editors and journalists via email, as none will be in the office and may not have access to a work phone number or the reception desk.

Retail status:

All retail stores will be closed throughout England in November. Only essential shops, supermarkets, and drugstores will be open. Retailers in the rest of the UK have social distancing regulations and masks must be worn.

The US's November Update

Workflow & office regulations:

As the US never went into full lockdown, different states, cities and companies have their own policies. In general, it is best to assume that employees in the American lifestyle industry are working from home. Industry professionals such as the press are reachable through email and sometimes on their personal phones, however, there can sometimes be delays due to teams working remotely, different publishing houses have varying rules for their employees.

Retail status:

As different states have imposed different lockdown rules and regulations, it depends on the area if high street retailers are open or not. In some states, and then again in some stores, face masks should be worn and hand sanitizers are available upon entrances and exits.

Local insight

Local insight into our 10 markets comes straight from the experiences and knowledge of our native lifestyle and market researchers.

Are you planning to travel for work, and want to know what the hygiene or quarantine regulations will be upon your arrival? How social will you be able to be during your stay? These questions are answered for you below.

Each country has been given a code: dark grey for full-lockdown, light grey for strict rules, green for relaxed regulations

Navigate your way through these updates by clicking on the arrows or the dots: 1. Denmark 2. Sweden 3. Norway 4. France 5. Italy 6. Germany 7. The Netherlands 8. Belgium 9. The UK 10. The US

Denmark's November Update

Travel corridors:

The Danish citizens are still being dissuaded from all unnecessary travels. In correlation to the increasing numbers of people infected by Covid-19 in Denmark, more countries have been added to the “quarantine list” and border control has been increased when entering Denmark. People who are residents in high-risk countries now have to present proof of a negative Covid-19 test before entering Denmark, among these countries are France, Italy & Austria.

General hygiene & social activities:

Due to the increasing numbers of people infected by Covid-19, face masks are now mandatory not only in public transportation, cafes, restaurant, and bars – but in all indoor places with public access. This includes grocery stores, malls, libraries, museums, cinemas, youth education, and health care. Gatherings have been further lowered from 50 to now only 10 people and the government is appealing to all unnecessary gatherings with a primary social agenda to be cancelled. Furthermore, bars, cafés and restaurants still have to close by 22:00 every night. Nightclubs and discos are still temporarily closed until further notice.

Sweden's November Update

Travel corridors:

The recommendation against all unnecessary traveling is still in place regarding countries marked red on Sweden’s Foreign Ministry’s website, these countries include the US (until Nov 15th) among other non-EU nations.

General hygiene & social activities:

A limit of 50 people at social gatherings is still in place which means that weddings and parties are asked to keep this restriction in mind. From the 1st of November it will be possible for public events to have a seated audience of 300 people in the venue.

Norway's November Update

Travel corridors:

All international travel is discouraged and most countries, including ALL European destinations, are by Norwegian standards marked “red”, meaning it is impossible to travel without being mandatory quarantined for 10 days upon return.

General hygiene & social activities:

The most invasive limitations for social activities have once again become the norm and no more than 5 people are allowed to meet in private homes (outside the people you live with). In public transport, people are asked to wear face coverings if they cannot contain the 1 meter distance recommended.

France's November Update

With an average of 40.000 cases per day and an increased death toll, the French government has set new lockdown measures starting October 30th. Those measures are established for 4 weeks across the whole country.

Travel corridors:

Traveling within France is no longer permitted. You may only leave your home with an exemption certificate for urgent family or professional reasons and urgent medical or juristic appointments. Traveling across the European Union member states is still allowed but all travelers must be tested at airports and ports. External borders with countries outside the EU are closed off.

General hygiene & social activities:

A general curfew from 21:00 to 06:00 went to effect in Paris and its nearby departments as well as eight other big areas including Lyon, Marseille and Nice. French people are only allowed to go out for 1 hour for recreational needs. Groups of more than 6 people in public places are forbidden and student parties are strictly prohibited. In enclosed public spaces you must wear a mask at all times. Local authorities may decide further restrictions. In some cities (including Paris) it may be required to wear a mask outside as well. Those who do not comply will be fined 135€ while repeated offends could get you find up to 3750€.

Italy's November Update

Travel corridors:

Domestic travels have been allowed since June 2nd and the borders have been opened for the EU and other European countries. Italians and foreigners are free to enter and travel, and body temperatures can be measured by the borders, restaurants, bars, and airports. Public transport is open and allowed whilst practicing social distance.

General hygiene & social activities:

Following the general European trend, Italy is experiencing a second wave with an increase in infections and deaths. Masks are mandatory in in-door public spaces, but many people in the larger cities put masks on as they step outside. The government is currently imposing local restrictions such as nighttime curfews, such as the one regarding Milan starting at 18:00. This means that the Milanese are not allowed to step outside after the indicated hour and all non-essential activities must close.

Germany's November Update

Travel corridors:

Denmark has been named a high-risk zone for Germany amongst many other countries, which means compulsory self-quarantining for 14 days when traveling to Germany from Copenhagen, as well as other risk zones. When returning from a risk area it is also compulsory to take a Covid-19 test at the airport, which is no longer free of charge. Covid Testing is priced at around 150€, depending on location. Going against quarantine guidelines can result in a fine or even a prison sentence.

When traveling to Germany, only essential trips will be allowed. Hotels etc. are only allowed to house guests traveling for a valid reason, not tourists.

General hygiene & social activities:

The contact restrictions in Germany have increased. Every state is still responsible for the implementation of federal regulations, which can slightly differ from each other. Hygienic regulations, such as a 1.5-meter distance and wearing masks in public areas, still apply in all states. The public still has to wear masks in public places, including public transport, shops, and stores. It is also mandatory to wear a mask outside, when in certain busy “risk zones” in the larger cities. Refusal to wear masks can result in a fine of 50€ upwards.
When meeting with people you are allowed to be a maximum of two different households and be a maximum of 10 people in total.

The Netherlands's November Update

Travel corridors:

The Netherlands uses a color-coded map that gets updated regularly to indicate positive (yellow) and negative (orange) travel advice. People returning to or entering the Netherlands from orange zones need to get tested and enter a 10-day quarantine at home. People can apply for their loved ones from other countries to enter the Netherlands for a period of a maximum of 90 days.

General hygiene & social activities:

It is advised to avoid travel as much as possible. It is mandatory to wear a face mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces. There’s a limit of 3 house guests a day. The maximum indoor capacity is 30 people with a 1.5-meter social distance between guests, and indoors as well as outdoors there’s a maximum of 4 people from different households per individual group.

Belgium's November Update

Belgium announced a nation-wide lockdown starting from 2. November until at least 13. December.

Travel corridors:

Couples who have been separated because they live in different countries will be allowed to cross the border if they can prove their relationship is sustainable. People returning to or entering Belgium after being abroad for more than 48 hours need to fill out the Passenger Locator Form. Belgium uses color-codes to indicate travel advice to countries and regions. Anyone returning from a red zone needs to get tested and stay in quarantine. People returning from an orange zone are advised to do the same.

General hygiene & social activities:

It is mandatory to wear a mask in indoor public places, on public transport and in outdoor crowded places where social distancing rules cannot be maintained. People are allowed to move around freely, though it is advised to avoid unnecessary travel. Only one close contact is allowed per household. Outdoors, there’s a limit of 4 people per group.

The UK's November Update

A nationwide lockdown across England was announced at the end of October. The lockdown will last throughout November – all other UK nations (Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland) are exempt from this full lockdown but all have tight restrictions in place.

Travel corridors:

The UK still has travel corridors for essential travel, however, if you are traveling to England you must be aware that the country is currently in lockdown and you will have to be in isolation during your stay. The lockdown in England means that you can only leave isolation to go to essential shops or for medical care. When entering any country in the UK, every person must complete a track-and-trace form provided by the government which acts as a legal declaration of your stay in the country.

General hygiene & social activities:

As well as an emphasis on social distancing and hygiene regulations, it is mandatory to wear face masks on public transport, in stores, and in all indoor public spaces in the UK. The lockdown in England means that no cultural, hospitality or free time activities will be open.

The US's November Lockdown

Travel corridors:

US residents can travel internationally to some countries, however, many countries do not advise their own residents to travel to the US and vice versa. As the regulations are also different from state to state within the US, it is important to check whether or not you are eligible for entry to the States and what the restrictions will be for you upon arrival.

General hygiene & social activities:

The US never imposed a nationwide lockdown and social distancing, general hygiene precautions, and face mask regulations vary throughout the whole country.

On top of the high rates of infection and unemployment, nationwide protests, and natural disasters the US has faced this year, the election will take place this month and the nation is deeply divided. It has been a trying year for many in the US and it is important to be patient and sensitive when in contact with individuals in the American market.

In the words of a journalist…

VOCAST’s Benelux Lifestyle Researcher spoke to a journalist from Knack Weekend Magazine about what life in the Belgian publishing industry has been like since lockdown and how their work has changed.

Lotte Philipsen, Lifestyle and Fashion Journalist at Knack Weekend

“Work has pretty much turned into a desk job. Research, interviews, finding inspiration: it all happens from home. I’ve done a ‘real’ interview once since, but most interviews happen on the phone, Zoom or Skype. Going out for events or reports has become a rare thing – I haven’t been on one. It does happen, but always on a very small scale, mostly outdoors, with mouth masks when required – and of course, social distancing. When it comes to big international events, I don’t believe there are (m)any Belgian journalists planning on going to fashion weeks right now, or in any case, no full weeks.”
 

 

VOCAST - the Brand Sharing Platform

This blog post was a collaborative effort written by our in-house team of curators, who are experts in identifying relevant influencers, as well as building email lists of important contacts for our fashion and home & interior brands.

 

 

 

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