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Why content should be shared in small snacks instead of big meals

Marketing

Internet and social media has changed the media industry and the way we consume content. From big bites to small bites, and that changes the way you should share content as a marketeer.

For me it is inspiring to see how small of a time gap Instagram manages to sneak into. Whereas I might postpone important books and articles that gives me a lot of value in my profession, Instagram gets my attention numerous times a day. Walking to the coffee machine takes 15,57 seconds at my office, and in that time I consume eight stories from five people and one ad. I actually timed it just to check. And brewing an espresso takes almost a minute. No telling how many stories, posts and ads that could give me, however that minute is far from enough to read a meaningful article and reflect over what it means for me or my company. And then there is the bus, the subway, during breakfast and the numerous small breaks we have during the day.

My point in mentioning Instagram is, that busy modern life yields little time for reflecting and digging deep. Whereas there are a thousand gaps during a day for simple snacks to pass through the filter. And more often than not, I end up never reading or finishing that important article because other things take over focus and it becomes outdated? The changed behaviour in how content is consumed is very visible in the traditional media industry.

Busy makes binary

All over the western world the domination trend in print publications has been a steady decline in revenue and reach since around beginning of the new millennium. This results in more busy editorial staff accepting more and more pre-produced content from brands like product shots, press releases and generally letting steady advertisers gain more ground in the editorial sections of the publication.

Looking towards scientific studies on editorial production it seems the same number of people produces 2-3 times the amount of content than they did just ten years ago. So what happens to people when you have to do more faster? One of the things we have noticed is, that busy tends to make people more binary. When you are swamped with emails and others things you have to process – you tend to choose the easy ones first. Looking for YES/NO in your to-do list, dilemmas and bigger things, where you have complicated assessments gets to stay longer on the to-do list before it becomes urgent enough to process.

So what does that mean for brands catering to journalists and digital influencers to share their images and words?

Communicate in snacks instead of meals. Do not send a We transfer link with an entire collection saying: “This is what we did. Hope you find something interesting in there?” Show them only what they like.

Do your research on your target group. Look at their social media feed and learn their taste and current state of mind and give them something that matches: “We just did a new ring collection of more than 100 products, but these three are the three you would like.” (I know because I analyse your social media feed and your content production and have historic data on your download behavior in our digital showroom and your sample history).

Select what you think is relevant and present it to that specific set of people and you will give them a binary choice. As oppose to a complicated task – they get an easy choice of sharing/publishing. Get in the mindset of a person who lives in a fast-pace environment – where it becomes habitual to grab and go. Cater to the online publishing behavior thus getting more coverage and staying on top of mind. Simply do research and execute a day to day plan. This is all it takes.

Jens Hamborg Koefoed

Jens Hamborg Koefoed

Founder of VOCAST

When Jens is not at VOCAST, he is probably chasing his twins around trying to make them behave. Loves surfing, traveling to tropic places and telling Steve Jobs anecdotes. Passionate about everything, lately about making the perfect how-to-live-sustainable-while-still-enjoying-life-list.

ANDRE ARTIKLER

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